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Winter's tale /

by Helprin, Mark.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Harvest book: Publisher: Orlando : Harcourt, [1983]Description: 748 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780156031196; 0156031191.Subject(s): Upper West Side (New York, N.Y.) -- Fiction | Irish Americans -- Fiction | Reincarnation -- Fiction | Paranormal fiction | Burglars -- Fiction | Supernatural -- Fiction | Romance fiction | Historical fiction | Fantasy fiction | Historical fiction | Fantasy fiction | Love stories | Fiction | Historical fiction | Fantasy fiction | Romance fiction | Historical fiction | Fantastic fiction | Love stories
Contents:
Machine derived contents note: I. The City -- A White Horse Escapes 3 -- The Ferry Burns in Morning Cold 10 -- Pearly Soames 20 -- Peter Lake Hangs from a Star 40 -- Beverly 95 -- A Goddess in the Bath 110 -- On the Marsh 130 -- Lake of the Coheeries 143 -- The Hospital in Printing House Square 173 -- Aceldama 191 -- Ii. Four Gates To The City -- Four Gates to the City 219 -- Lake of the Coheeries 221 -- In the Drifts 264 -- A New Life 347 -- Hell Gate 370 -- Iii. The Sun ... And The Ghost -- Nothing Is Random 401 -- Peter Lake Returns 403 -- The Sun 418 -- ... and The Ghost 438 -- An Early Summer Dinner at Petipas 445 -- The Machine Age 456 -- Iv. A Golden Age -- A Very Short History of the Clouds 505 -- Battery Bridge 507 -- White Horse and Dark Horse 544 -- The White Dog of Afghanistan 579 -- Abysmillard Redux 591 -- Ex Machina 606 -- For the Soldiers and Sailors of Chelsea 641 -- The City Alight 666 -- A Golden Age 697 -- epilogue 747.
Summary: When master mechanic Peter Lake attempts to rob a mansion on the Upper West Side, he is caught by young Beverly Penn, the terminally ill daughter of the house, and their subsequent love sends Peter on a desperate personal journey.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Now a major motion pictureNew York Times bestseller"Utterly extraordinary . . . A piercing sense of the beautiful arising from narrative and emotional fantasy is everywhere alive in the novel . . . Not for some time have I read a work as funny, thoughtful, passionate or large-souled . . . I find myself nervous, to a degree I don't recall in my past as a reviewer, about failing the work, inadequately displaying its brilliance." - Benjamin DeMott, New York Times Book Review<br> <br> Mark Helprin's masterpiece will transport you to New York of the Belle Epoque, to a city clarified by a siege of unprecedented snows. One winter night, Peter Lake - master mechanic and second-storey man - attempts to rob a fortress-like mansion on the Upper West Side. Though he thinks it is empty, the daughter of the house is home. Thus begins the affair between a middle-aged Irish burglar and Beverly Penn, a young girl dying of consumption. It is a love so powerful that Peter Lake, a simple and uneducated man, will be driven to stop time and bring back the dead. His great struggle is one of the most beautiful and extraordinary stories of American literature."He creates tableaux of such beauty and clarity that the inner eye is stunned." - Publishers Weekly<br> <br> "This novel stretches the boundaries of contemporary literature. It is a gifted writer's love affair with the language." - Newsday

When master mechanic Peter Lake attempts to rob a mansion on the Upper West Side, he is caught by young Beverly Penn, the terminally ill daughter of the house, and their subsequent love sends Peter on a desperate personal journey.

Machine derived contents note: I. The City -- A White Horse Escapes 3 -- The Ferry Burns in Morning Cold 10 -- Pearly Soames 20 -- Peter Lake Hangs from a Star 40 -- Beverly 95 -- A Goddess in the Bath 110 -- On the Marsh 130 -- Lake of the Coheeries 143 -- The Hospital in Printing House Square 173 -- Aceldama 191 -- Ii. Four Gates To The City -- Four Gates to the City 219 -- Lake of the Coheeries 221 -- In the Drifts 264 -- A New Life 347 -- Hell Gate 370 -- Iii. The Sun ... And The Ghost -- Nothing Is Random 401 -- Peter Lake Returns 403 -- The Sun 418 -- ... and The Ghost 438 -- An Early Summer Dinner at Petipas 445 -- The Machine Age 456 -- Iv. A Golden Age -- A Very Short History of the Clouds 505 -- Battery Bridge 507 -- White Horse and Dark Horse 544 -- The White Dog of Afghanistan 579 -- Abysmillard Redux 591 -- Ex Machina 606 -- For the Soldiers and Sailors of Chelsea 641 -- The City Alight 666 -- A Golden Age 697 -- epilogue 747.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • I The City A White Horse Escapes (p. 3)
  • The Ferry Burns in Morning Cold (p. 10)
  • Pearly Soames (p. 20)
  • Peter Lake Hangs from a Star (p. 40)
  • Beverly (p. 95)
  • A Goddess in the Bath (p. 110)
  • On the Marsh (p. 130)
  • Lake of the Coheeries (p. 143)
  • The Hospital in Printing House Square (p. 173)
  • Aceldama (p. 191)
  • II Four Gates to the (p. City)
  • Four Gates to the City (p. 219)
  • Lake of the Coheeries (p. 221)
  • In the Drifts (p. 264)
  • A New Life (p. 347)
  • Hell Gate (p. 370)
  • III The Sun...and the Ghost
  • Nothing Is Random (p. 401)
  • Peter Lake Returns (p. 403)
  • The Sun... (p. 418)
  • ...and The Ghost (p. 438)
  • An Early Summer Dinner at Petipas (p. 445)
  • The Machine Age (p. 456)
  • IV A Golden age
  • A Very Short History of the Clouds (p. 505)
  • Battery Bridge (p. 507)
  • White Horse and Dark Horse (p. 544)
  • The White Dog of Afghanistan (p. 579)
  • Abysmillard Redux (p. 591)
  • Ex Machina (p. 606)
  • For the Soldiers and Sailors of Chelsea (p. 641)
  • The City Alight (p. 666)
  • A Golden Age (p. 697)
  • epilogue (p. 747)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">A WHITE HORSE ESCAPESTHERE WAS a white horse, on a quiet winter morning when snow covered the streets gently and was not deep, and the sky was swept with vibrant stars, except in the east, where dawn was beginning in a light blue flood. The air was motionless, but would soon start to move as the sun came up and winds from Canada came charging down the Hudson.The horse had escaped from his master's small clapboard stable in Brooklyn. He trotted alone over the carriage road of the Williamsburg Bridge, before the light, while the toll keeper was sleeping by his stove and many stars were still blazing above the city. Fresh snow on the bridge muffled his hoofbeats, and he sometimes turned his head and looked behind him to see if he was being followed. He was warm from his own effort and he breathed steadily, having loped four or five miles through the dead of Brooklyn past silent churches and shuttered stores. Far to the south, in the black, ice-choked waters of the Narrows, a sparkling light marked the ferry on its way to Manhattan, where only market men were up, waiting for the fishing boats to glide down through Hell Gate and the night.The horse was crazy, but, still, he was able to worry about what he had done. He knew that shortly his master and mistress would arise and light the fire. Utterly humiliated, the cat would be tossed out the kitchen door, to fly backward into a snow-covered sawdust pile. The scent of blueberries and hot batter would mix with the sweet smell of a pine fire, and not too long afterward his master would stride across the yard to the stable to feed him and hitch him up to the milk wagon. But he would not be there.This was a good joke, this defiance which made his heart beat in terror, for he was sure his master would soon be after him. Though he realized that he might be subject to a painful beating, he sensed that the master was amused, pleased, and touched by rebellion as often as not-if it were in the proper form and done well, courageously. A shapeless, coarse revolt (such as kicking down the stable door) would occasion the whip. But not even then would the master always use it, because he prized a spirited animal, and he knew of and was grateful for the mysterious intelligence of this white horse, an intelligence that even he could not ignore except at his peril and to his sadness. Besides, he loved the horse and did not really mind the chase through Manhattan (where the horse always went), since it afforded him the chance to enlist old friends in the search, and the opportunity of visiting a great number of saloons where he would inquire, over a beer or two, if anyone had seen his enormous and beautiful white stallion rambling about in the nude, without bit, bridle, or blanket.The horse could not do without Manhattan. It drew him like a magnet, like a vacuum, like oats, or a mare, or an open, never-ending, tree-lined toad. He came off the bridge ramp and stopped short. A thousand streets lay before him, sil Excerpted from Winter's Tale by Mark Helprin All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

"This novel is imaginatively engaging as well as entertaining, and it will find an eager audience among adults and older adolescents alike," predicted LJ's reviewer quite accurately (LJ 8/83)‘the book became a smash best seller. This magical story of the multiple lives of protagonist Peter Lake is now available in an oversized trade paper edition. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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