Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Daughter of Moloka'i /

by Brennert, Alan [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2019.Edition: First U. S. edition.Description: 308 pages : map ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781250137661; 1250137667.Subject(s): Manzanar War Relocation Center -- Fiction | Adoptees -- Fiction | Mothers and daughters -- Fiction | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Fiction | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Fiction | Historical fiction | Fiction | Historical fiction | Historical fictionSummary: Rachel Kalama was quarantined for most of her life at the isolated leprosy settlement of Kalaupapa-- and forced to give up her daughter at birth. Ruth is taken to the Kapi'olani Home for Girls in Honolulu, and adopted by a Japanese couple who raise her on a farm in California. During World War II Ruth and her husband suffer internment at Manzanar Relocation Camp. After the war, she receives a letter from Rachel. As the two meet and come to love one another, Ruth discovers a past she knew nothing about. -- adapted from jacket
List(s) this item appears in: Japanese Internment
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Fiction FIC BRE (Browse shelf) Available 39270004775676
Books Books Bob Lucas Memorial Library
Adult Collection Adult Fiction BRANCH FIC BRE (Browse shelf) Available 39270004772624

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> NOW A LOS ANGELES TIMES BESTSELLER | NAMED A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK BY: USA Today * BookRiot * BookBub * LibraryReads * OC Register * Never Ending Voyage <br> <br> The highly anticipated sequel to Alan Brennert's acclaimed book club favorite, and national bestseller, Moloka'i <br> <br> "A novel of illumination and affection." -- USA Today <br> <br> Alan Brennert's beloved novel Moloka'i , currently has over 600,000 copies in print. This companion tale tells the story of Ruth, the daughter that Rachel Kalama--quarantined for most of her life at the isolated leprosy settlement of Kalaupapa--was forced to give up at birth.</p> <p>The book follows young Ruth from her arrival at the Kapi'olani Home for Girls in Honolulu, to her adoption by a Japanese couple who raise her on a strawberry and grape farm in California, her marriage and unjust internment at Manzanar Relocation Camp during World War II--and then, after the war, to the life-altering day when she receives a letter from a woman who says she is Ruth's birth mother, Rachel.</p> <p> Daughter of Moloka'i expands upon Ruth and Rachel's 22-year relationship, only hinted at in Moloka'i . It's a richly emotional tale of two women--different in some ways, similar in others--who never expected to meet, much less come to love, one another. And for Ruth it is a story of discovery, the unfolding of a past she knew nothing about. Told in vivid, evocative prose that conjures up the beauty and history of both Hawaiian and Japanese cultures, it's the powerful and poignant tale that readers of Moloka'i have been awaiting for fifteen years.</p>

Sequel to: Moloka'i / by Alan Brennert. New York : St. Martin's Press, c2003.

Rachel Kalama was quarantined for most of her life at the isolated leprosy settlement of Kalaupapa-- and forced to give up her daughter at birth. Ruth is taken to the Kapi'olani Home for Girls in Honolulu, and adopted by a Japanese couple who raise her on a farm in California. During World War II Ruth and her husband suffer internment at Manzanar Relocation Camp. After the war, she receives a letter from Rachel. As the two meet and come to love one another, Ruth discovers a past she knew nothing about. -- adapted from jacket

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Brennert continues the story of some of the characters from 2003's Moloka'i. Protagonist Ruth is removed from the leprosy settlement at birth and sent to an orphanage in Honolulu until she is adopted by Japanese immigrants. In 1922, the family moves to California to help manage a strawberry farm. They encounter anti-Japanese attitudes that crescendo into fury after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Stripped of property and possessions, the Japanese are sent to Manzanar internment camp, where Ruth's extended family adapt to harsh conditions. After the war, Ruth receives an unexpected message from her birth mother, Rachel, whose leprosy has been cured and who hopes to meet Ruth. As Ruth learns more about her Hawaiian heritage, she draws Rachel into her family circle. Although Brennert provides enough background for this novel to stand alone, readers familiar with Rachel's story will be glad to learn what happens after she leaves Moloka'i. The most compelling sections involve life within the internment camps, conflicts within families and among detainees, and the harsh treatment by government officials. -VERDICT Although Moloka'i is more compelling and complex, this sequel will be welcomed by readers wanting to know more about the family. [See Prepub Alert, 8/20/18.]-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State Univ. Lib., Mankato © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Novelist Select