Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Fever dream : a novel /

by Schweblin, Samanta [author.]; McDowell, Megan [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Riverhead Books, [2017]Description: 183 pages ; 19 cm.ISBN: 9780399184598; 0399184597.Language note: Translated from the Spanish.Uniform titles: Núcleo del disturbio. English.Subject(s): Families -- Fiction | FICTION -- Literary | FICTION -- Psychological | FICTION -- Horror | Psychological fiction | Fiction | Psychological fiction | Psychological fiction | Romans psychologiqueSummary: "A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She's not his mother. He's not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family. Fever Dream is a nightmare come to life, a ghost story for the real world, a love story and a cautionary tale. One of the freshest new voices to come out of the Spanish language and translated into English for the first time, Samanta Schweblin creates an aura of strange psychological menace and otherworldly reality in this absorbing, unsettling, taut novel"-- Provided by publisher.
Awards: Click to open in new window
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Fiction FIC SCH Checked out 12/07/2019 39270004768531

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"Genius." --Jia Tolentino, The New Yorker<br> <br> "Samanta Schweblin's electric story reads like a Fever Dream ." --Vanity Fair<br> <br> Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize! <br> <br> Experience the blazing, surreal sensation of a fever dream... <br> <br> A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She's not his mother. He's not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family. <br> <br> Fever Dream is a nightmare come to life, a ghost story for the real world, a love story and a cautionary tale. One of the freshest new voices to come out of the Spanish language and translated into English for the first time, Samanta Schweblin creates an aura of strange psychological menace and otherworldly reality in this absorbing, unsettling, taut novel.

"A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She's not his mother. He's not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family. Fever Dream is a nightmare come to life, a ghost story for the real world, a love story and a cautionary tale. One of the freshest new voices to come out of the Spanish language and translated into English for the first time, Samanta Schweblin creates an aura of strange psychological menace and otherworldly reality in this absorbing, unsettling, taut novel"-- Provided by publisher.

Translated from the Spanish.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">They're like worms. What kind of worms? Like worms, all over. It's the boy who's talking, murmuring into my ear. I am the one asking questions. Worms in the body? Yes, in the body. Earthworms? No, another kind of worms. It's dark and I can't see. The sheets are rough, they bunch up under my body. I can't move, but I'm talking. It's the worms. You have to be patient and wait. And while we wait, we have to find the exact moment when the worms come into being. Why? Because it's important, it's very important for us all. I try to nod, but my body doesn't respond. What else is happening in the yard outside the house? Am I in the yard? No, you're not, but Carla, your mother, is. I met her a few days ago, when we first got to the vacation house. What is Carla doing? She finishes her coffee and leaves the mug in the grass, next to her lounge chair. What else? She gets up and walks away. She's forgetting her sandals, which are a few feet away on the pool steps, but I don't say anything. Why not? Because I want to wait and see what she does. And what does she do? She slings her purse over her shoulder and walks toward the car in her gold bikini. There's something like mutual fascination between us, and also at times, brief moments of repulsion; I can feel them in very specific situations. Are you sure these kinds of comments are necessary? Do we have time for this? Your observations are very important. Why are you in the yard? Because we've just gotten back from the lake, and your mother doesn't want to come into my house. She wants to save you any trouble. What kind of trouble? I have to go inside anyway, first for some iced tea with lemon, then for the sunscreen. That doesn't seem like she's saving me any trouble. Why did you go to the lake? She wanted me to teach her how to drive, she said she'd always wanted to learn. But once we were at the lake, neither of us had the patience for it. What is she doing now, in the yard? She opens the door of my car, gets into the driver'sseat, and digs around in her purse for a while. I swing my legs down off the lounge chair and wait. It's so hot. Then Carla gets tired of rummaging around, and she grips the steering wheel with both hands. She stays like that for a moment, looking toward the gate, or maybe toward her own house, far beyond the gate. What else? Why are you quiet? It's just, I'm stuck. I can see the story perfectly, but sometimes it's hard to move forward. Is it becauseof the nurses' injections? No. But I'm going to die in a few hours. That's going tohappen, isn't it? It's strange how calm I am. Because even though you haven't told me, I know. And still, it's an impossible thing to tell yourself. None of this is important. We're wasting time. But it's true, right? That I'm going to die. What else is happening in the yard? Excerpted from Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Schweblin, who is Buenos Aires-born and now lives in Berlin, makes her English--language novel debut, thanks to -McDowell's crisp translation. Worms, migrating souls, unseen toxins, and deformed children punctuate a mysterious dialog between Amanda, a dying woman in an emergency clinic, and David, a boy not her son. The print version uses italics to distinguish David's part of the conversation from Amanda's; here, veteran narrator -Hillary Huber impressively, instantly, adapts her voice as necessary. Amanda and David take turns reconstructing an elliptical recent past that begins "a few days ago" when Amanda met David's mother, Carla, at a lake house. Amanda adds another narrative layer, sharing Carla's story from six years previous when David fell devastatingly ill after drinking from a poisoned stream. Saving his body cleaves his soul, the consequences of which lead inexplicably to Amanda's daughter Nina. VERDICT Part unreliable nightmare, part dysfunctional confession, part eco-parable, -Schweblin's slim title should prove irresistible to contemporary world literature aficionados. ["Schweblin's surreal debut novel will be a breath of fresh air": LJ 1/17 starred review of the Riverhead hc.]-Terry Hong, Smithsonian BookDragon, Washington, DC © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Novelist Select