Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Devil's day /

by Hurley, Andrew Michael [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018.Edition: First US edition.Description: 295 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781328489883; 1328489884.Subject(s): Grandfathers -- Death -- Fiction | Autumn -- Fiction | Shepherds -- Fiction | Boundaries -- Fiction | Devil -- Fiction | FICTION -- Literary | FICTION -- Horror | FICTION -- Small Town & Rural | Fiction | Horror fiction | Thrillers (Fiction) | Horror fiction | Occult fiction | Horror fiction | Thrillers (Fiction)Summary: "In the wink of an eye, as quick as a flea, / The Devil he jumped from me to thee. / And only when the Devil had gone, / Did I know that he and I'd been one ... Every autumn, John Pentecost returns to the farm where he grew up, to help gather the sheep down from the moors for the winter. Very little changes in the Endlands, but this year, his grandfather--the Gaffer--has died and John's new wife, Katherine, is accompanying him for the first time. Each year, the Gaffer would redraw the boundary lines of the village, with pen and paper but also through the remembrance of tales and timeless communal rituals, which keep the sheep safe from the Devil. But as the farmers of the Endlands bury the Gaffer and prepare to gather the sheep, they begin to wonder whether they've let the Devil in after all."-- Provided by publisher.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Fiction FIC HUR Available 39270004760330

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A new novel by the author of The Loney, which was praised by Stephen King as "an amazing piece of fiction." <br> <br> In the wink of an eye, as quick as a flea, <br> The Devil he jumped from me to thee. <br> And only when the Devil had gone, <br> Did I know that he and I'd been one . . . <br> <br> Every autumn, John Pentecost returns to the farm where he grew up, to help gather the sheep down from the moors for the winter. Very little changes in the Endlands, but this year, his grandfather--the Gaffer--has died and John's new wife, Katherine, is accompanying him for the first time.<br> <br> Each year, the Gaffer would redraw the boundary lines of the village, with pen and paper but also through the remembrance of tales and timeless communal rituals, which keep the sheep safe from the Devil. But as the farmers of the Endlands bury the Gaffer and prepare to gather the sheep, they begin to wonder whether they've let the Devil in after all.

"In the wink of an eye, as quick as a flea, / The Devil he jumped from me to thee. / And only when the Devil had gone, / Did I know that he and I'd been one ... Every autumn, John Pentecost returns to the farm where he grew up, to help gather the sheep down from the moors for the winter. Very little changes in the Endlands, but this year, his grandfather--the Gaffer--has died and John's new wife, Katherine, is accompanying him for the first time. Each year, the Gaffer would redraw the boundary lines of the village, with pen and paper but also through the remembrance of tales and timeless communal rituals, which keep the sheep safe from the Devil. But as the farmers of the Endlands bury the Gaffer and prepare to gather the sheep, they begin to wonder whether they've let the Devil in after all."-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Every fall, John Pentecost returns to the Endlands, the farmland that has been in his family for generations. To celebrate the "Gathering," families assemble the sheep down from the moors for the winter to keep them safe from the Devil. This year, John's grandfather has just died, and John brings his wife, Kat, for the funeral. Entering into a close-knit community filled with superstitions and odd traditions, Kat comes to realize the costs of trying to keep the Devil at bay. Hurley's second novel (after the Costa Award-winning The Loney) is poetically written and heavily detailed; however, it's greatly focused on setting and atmosphere, leaving the character development lacking. Also, John's omniscient narrative is distracting at times, as it's delivered from some point in the future. -VERDICT While not as gripping as The Loney, the work's dark tone and slow buildup of suspense will still interest readers of gothic fiction. [Library marketing.]--Natalie Browning, LongwoodUniv. Lib., Farmville, VA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Novelist Select