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Spinning /

by Walden, Tillie [author,].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : First Second, [2017]Edition: First edition.Description: 395 pages : chiefly illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781626727724; 1626727724.Subject(s): Walden, Tillie, 1996- -- Childhood and youth -- Comic books, strips, etc | Lesbian figure skaters -- United States -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Figure skaters -- United States -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Women cartoonists -- United States -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Cartoonists -- United States -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Lesbian teenagers -- United States -- Biography -- Comic books, strips, etc | Coming out (Sexual orientation) -- United States -- Comic books, strips, etc | Walden, Tillie, 1996- -- Childhood and youth -- Cartoons and comics | Cartoonists -- Cartoons and comics | Figure skaters -- Cartoons and comics | Coming of age -- Cartoons and comics | Women -- Biography -- Cartoons and comics | Graphic novels | Autobiographies | Biography | Graphic novels | Graphic novels | Autobiographical comics | Coming-of-age comics | Biographical comic books
Contents:
1. Waltz jump -- 2. Scratch spin -- 3. Flip jump -- 4. Axel -- 5. Spiral -- 6. Camel spin -- 7. Spread eagle -- 8. Counter -- 9. Lutz -- 10. Twizzle.
Awards: Booklist Editor's Choice/Books for Youth 2017.Summary: Ignatz Award winner Tillie Walden's powerful graphic memoir captures what it's like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know. It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark. Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again. She was good. She won. And she hated it. For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden's life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she'd outgrown her passion--and she finally needed to find her own voice.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult New Book Shelf YA GN WAL, T. Available 39270004758979

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> Tillie Walden's Eisner Award winning graphic memoir Spinning captures what it's like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know. <br> <br> It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark.</p> <p>Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again.</p> <p>She was good. She won. And she hated it.</p> <p>For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden's life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she'd outgrown her passion--and she finally needed to find her own voice.</p> <p>This title has Common Core connections.</p> <p> A New York City Public Library Notable Best Book for Teens <br> A Chicago Public Library Best Book of 2017 <br> A 2018 YALSA Great Graphic Novel <br> A 2017 Booklist Youth Editors' Choice </p>

Graphic novel.

1. Waltz jump -- 2. Scratch spin -- 3. Flip jump -- 4. Axel -- 5. Spiral -- 6. Camel spin -- 7. Spread eagle -- 8. Counter -- 9. Lutz -- 10. Twizzle.

Ignatz Award winner Tillie Walden's powerful graphic memoir captures what it's like to come of age, come out, and come to terms with leaving behind everything you used to know. It was the same every morning. Wake up, grab the ice skates, and head to the rink while the world was still dark. Weekends were spent in glitter and tights at competitions. Perform. Smile. And do it again. She was good. She won. And she hated it. For ten years, figure skating was Tillie Walden's life. She woke before dawn for morning lessons, went straight to group practice after school, and spent weekends competing at ice rinks across the state. Skating was a central piece of her identity, her safe haven from the stress of school, bullies, and family. But as she switched schools, got into art, and fell in love with her first girlfriend, she began to question how the close-minded world of figure skating fit in with the rest of her life, and whether all the work was worth it given the reality: that she, and her friends on the team, were nowhere close to Olympic hopefuls. The more Tillie thought about it, the more Tillie realized she'd outgrown her passion--and she finally needed to find her own voice.

Booklist Editor's Choice/Books for Youth 2017.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

In a graphic memoir, former competitive figure skater and synchronized skater Walden looks back at her twelve years growing up in the world of competitive sports. The shadowy, cool bluish-purples of most of the pencil drawings reflect young Tillies mood for much of the narrative: although shes committed to her skating, it rarely brings her joy. Meanwhile, shes being bullied; her family relationships are strained; she feels the need to hide her homosexuality; she struggles academically; and she is sexually assaulted by her SAT tutor. The skating world serves mainly as a well-realized backdrop for a story about holding secrets in and going against expectations. Walden, whose growing interest in art is a recurring theme throughout her memoir, knows when to let this books art or text be spare and when to interrupt the purple sleepiness with a pop of golden yellow; the occasional incompletely drawn figures are clearly deliberate, whether to protect her own memory or someone elses anonymity. She sometimes only hints at her motivations, giving the impression that, like many adolescents, shes not fully sure what they are. The result is much more layered than the tell-all about the seedy world of glittering young ice skaters that, according to the authors note, Walden (now only a few years removed from the events) originally intended to create. shoshana flax (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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