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After Emily : two remarkable women and the legacy of America's greatest poet /

by Dobrow, Julie [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Company, Independent Publishers 1923, [2018]Edition: First edition.Description: xxii, 426 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780393249262.Subject(s): Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886 -- Friends and associates | Todd, Mabel Loomis, 1856-1932 | Bingham, Millicent Todd, 1880-1968
Contents:
"One fine day in May" (1886) -- Arriving in Amherst (1856-1881) -- Meeting and courting the Dickinsons (1881-1882) -- Soaring love and seething tensions (1883-1894) -- Dickinsonian inspiration (1883-1893) -- Lingering puritanism and Millicent's sensibilities (1884-1897) -- Embracing Emily's poems (1886-1897) -- Losing Austin, finding Mabel (1895-1904) -- Suing the "Queen of Amherst" (1897-1898) -- Traveling and travails (1899-1917) -- "Sincerely, Joe Thomas" (1918-1919) -- Fighting to define Emily Dickinson (1920-1929) -- Bringing lost poems to light (1930-1939) -- Dealing with Dickinsoniana" (1940-1955) -- Battling over Emily's Papers (1946-1959) -- Seeking closure and meaning (1960-1968) -- Unpacking the camphorwood chest -- Sorting through the clutter.
Summary: "The untold story of the mother and daughter who opened the door to Emily Dickinson's poetry. Emily Dickinson may be the most widely read and beloved of all American poets, but the story behind her work's initial, posthumous publication in 1890 and the mother-and-daughter team most responsible for her enduring legacy are barely known. After Emily recounts the extraordinary lives of Mabel Loomis Todd and her daughter, Millicent Todd Bingham, and the powerful literary legacy they shared. Mabel's complicated relationships with the Dickinsons--including her thirteen-year extramarital affair with Emily's brother, Austin--roiled the small town of Amherst, Massachusetts. Mabel and Austin's love led to her work with Emily Dickinson's poetry, which inspired both Mabel's life and her daughter's, and fed controversies over the poetry's promotion, editing, and ownership. Julie Dobrow has unearthed hundreds of primary sources to tell this compelling narrative and reveal the surprising impact Mabel and Millicent had on the Emily Dickinson we know today"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: POETRY
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Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Biography BIO TOD, M. (Browse shelf) Available 39270004749788

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Despite Emily Dickinson's world renown, the story of the two women most responsible for her initial posthumous publication--Mabel Loomis Todd and her daughter, Millicent Todd Bingham--has remained in the shadows of the archives. A rich and compelling portrait of women who refused to be confined by the social mores of their era, After Emily explores Mabel and Millicent's complex bond, as well as the powerful literary legacy they shared.Mabel's tangled relationships with the Dickinsons--including a thirteen-year extramarital relationship with Emily's brother, Austin--roiled the small town of Amherst, Massachusetts. After Emily's death, Mabel's connection to the family and reputation as an intelligent, artistic, and industrious woman in her own right led her to the enormous trove of poems Emily left behind. So began the herculean task of transcribing, editing, and promoting Emily's work, a task that would consume and complicate the lives of both Mabel and her daughter. As the popularity of the poems grew, legal issues arose between the Dickinson and Todd families, dredging up their scandals: the affair, the ownership of Emily's poetry, and the right to define the so-called "Belle of Amherst."Utilizing hundreds of overlooked letters and diaries to weave together the stories of three unstoppable women, Julie Dobrow explores the intrigue of Emily Dickinson's literary beginnings. After Emily sheds light on the importance of the earliest editions of Emily's work--including the controversial editorial decisions made to introduce her singular genius to the world--and reveals the surprising impact Mabel and Millicent had on the poet we know today.

"The untold story of the mother and daughter who opened the door to Emily Dickinson's poetry. Emily Dickinson may be the most widely read and beloved of all American poets, but the story behind her work's initial, posthumous publication in 1890 and the mother-and-daughter team most responsible for her enduring legacy are barely known. After Emily recounts the extraordinary lives of Mabel Loomis Todd and her daughter, Millicent Todd Bingham, and the powerful literary legacy they shared. Mabel's complicated relationships with the Dickinsons--including her thirteen-year extramarital affair with Emily's brother, Austin--roiled the small town of Amherst, Massachusetts. Mabel and Austin's love led to her work with Emily Dickinson's poetry, which inspired both Mabel's life and her daughter's, and fed controversies over the poetry's promotion, editing, and ownership. Julie Dobrow has unearthed hundreds of primary sources to tell this compelling narrative and reveal the surprising impact Mabel and Millicent had on the Emily Dickinson we know today"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 379-407) and index.

"One fine day in May" (1886) -- Arriving in Amherst (1856-1881) -- Meeting and courting the Dickinsons (1881-1882) -- Soaring love and seething tensions (1883-1894) -- Dickinsonian inspiration (1883-1893) -- Lingering puritanism and Millicent's sensibilities (1884-1897) -- Embracing Emily's poems (1886-1897) -- Losing Austin, finding Mabel (1895-1904) -- Suing the "Queen of Amherst" (1897-1898) -- Traveling and travails (1899-1917) -- "Sincerely, Joe Thomas" (1918-1919) -- Fighting to define Emily Dickinson (1920-1929) -- Bringing lost poems to light (1930-1939) -- Dealing with Dickinsoniana" (1940-1955) -- Battling over Emily's Papers (1946-1959) -- Seeking closure and meaning (1960-1968) -- Unpacking the camphorwood chest -- Sorting through the clutter.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • 1886 Map of Amherst (p. x)
  • Preface (p. xiii)
  • Introduction One Fine Day in May (1886) (p. 1)
  • Chapter 1 Arriving in Amherst (1856-1881) (p. 9)
  • Chapter 2 Meeting and Courting the Dickinsons (1881-1882) (p. 29)
  • Chapter 3 Soaring Love and Seething Tensions (1883-1894) (p. 53)
  • Chapter 4 Dickinsonian Inspiration: Mabel's Creative Output (1883-1893) (p. 82)
  • Chapter 5 Lingering Puritanism and Millicent's Sensibilities (1884-1897) (p. 92)
  • Chapter 6 Embracing Emily's Poems (1886-1897) (p. 111)
  • Chapter 7 Losing Austin, Finding Mabel (1895-1904) (p. 158)
  • Chapter 8 Suing the "Queen of Amherst" (1897-1898) (p. 176)
  • Chapter 9 Traveling and Travails (1899-1917) (p. 192)
  • Chapter 10 "Sincerely, Joe Thomas" (1918-1919) (p. 210)
  • Chapter 11 Fighting to Define Emily Dickinson (1920-1929) (p. 224)
  • Chapter 12 Bringing Lost Poems to Light (1930-1939) (p. 245)
  • Chapter 13 Dealing with "Dickinsoniana" (1940-1955) (p. 272)
  • Chapter 14 Battling over Emily's Papers (1946-1959) (p. 295)
  • Chapter 15 Seeking Closure and Meaning (1960-1968) (p. 325)
  • Chapter 16 Unpacking the Camphorwood Chest (p. 342)
  • Afterword Sorting through the Clutter (p. 363)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 371)
  • Notes (p. 379)
  • Text Credits (p. 409)
  • Illustration Credits (p. 411)
  • Index (p. 417)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

One could argue that had it not been for the efforts of Mabel Loomis Todd (1856-1932) and her daughter Millicent Todd Bingham (1880-1968), Emily Dickinson (1830-86) would not be known as America's Greatest Poet. Here, Dobrow (Ctr. for Interdisciplinary Studies, Tufts Univ.) tells the women's stories. As a family friend of the Dickinsons in Amherst, MA, Mabel was introduced to Emily's poetry, which she found quite powerful. Complicating matters, Mabel began a decade-long affair with Emily's also-married brother, Austin. Following Emily's death, Mabel worked hard to get her poetry into print and succeeded, which led to long-lasting personal and legal feuds with Emily's heirs. Millicent sought her own path, free from her mother's entanglements, including the poet's oeuvre, but her own intellectual interests as a geographer soon played second fiddle to Emily and her legacy when a cache of hidden manuscripts was revealed. VERDICT The biographical material related to Emily Dickinson's legacy is the work's driving force, but Dobrow's skillful account of Mabel's and Millicent's lives makes this page-turner a must-read for the poet's most ardent fans.-Brian Flota, James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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