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Chandra's cosmos : dark matter, black holes, and other wonders revealed by NASA's premier X-ray observatory /

by Tucker, Wallace H.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington, DC : Smithsonian Books, [2017]Description: 266 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781588345875; 1588345874.Subject(s): Chandra X-ray Observatory (U.S.) | X-ray astronomy | SCIENCE -- Astronomy | SCIENCE -- Physics -- Astrophysics
Contents:
Introduction : cool stories from the hot universe -- Part I. The big. Galaxy clusters -- The evidence for dark matter -- Cold dark matter -- Dark matter going bananas -- The wonderful--and fearful--dark side -- What is dark energy? -- The cosmic web -- Part II. The bad. Taking pleasure in the dimness of stars -- Cygnus X-1, microquasars, and the galactic jet set -- Downtown Milky Way -- The secret in the middle -- Ducks unlimited -- The origin and growth of supermassive black holes -- Green black holes -- Black hole feedback -- Part III. The beautiful. Going not gentle into that good night -- Core collapse -- The crab and other pulsar wind nebulas -- A thin cosmic rain : particles from outer space -- Elemental change -- Cosmic renewal.
Summary: On July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever built, was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Since then, Chandra has given us a view of the universe that is largely hidden from telescopes sensitive only to visible light. In Chandra's Cosmos, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra science spokesperson Wallace H. Tucker uses a series of short, connected stories to describe the telescope's exploration of the hot, high-energy face of the universe. The book is organized in three parts: "The Big," covering the cosmic web, dark energy, dark matter, and massive clusters of galaxies; "The Bad," exploring neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes; and "The Beautiful," discussing stars, exoplanets, and life.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

On July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever built, was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia . Since then, Chandra has given us a view of the universe that is largely hidden from telescopes sensitive only to visible light. In Chandra's Cosmos , the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra science spokesperson Wallace H. Tucker uses a series of short, connected stories to describe the telescope's exploration of the hot, high-energy face of the universe. The book is organized in three parts- "The Big," covering the cosmic web, dark energy, dark matter, and massive clusters of galaxies; "The Bad," exploring neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes; and "The Beautiful," discussing stars, exoplanets, and life.<br> <br> Chandra has imaged the spectacular, glowing remains of exploded stars and taken spectra showing the dispersal of their elements. Chandra has observed the region around the supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way and traced the separation of dark matter from normal matter in the collision of galaxies, contributing to both dark matter and dark energy studies. Tucker explores the implications of these observations in an entertaining, informative narrative aimed at space buffs and general readers alike.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-254) and index.

Introduction : cool stories from the hot universe -- Part I. The big. Galaxy clusters -- The evidence for dark matter -- Cold dark matter -- Dark matter going bananas -- The wonderful--and fearful--dark side -- What is dark energy? -- The cosmic web -- Part II. The bad. Taking pleasure in the dimness of stars -- Cygnus X-1, microquasars, and the galactic jet set -- Downtown Milky Way -- The secret in the middle -- Ducks unlimited -- The origin and growth of supermassive black holes -- Green black holes -- Black hole feedback -- Part III. The beautiful. Going not gentle into that good night -- Core collapse -- The crab and other pulsar wind nebulas -- A thin cosmic rain : particles from outer space -- Elemental change -- Cosmic renewal.

On July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the most powerful X-ray telescope ever built, was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia. Since then, Chandra has given us a view of the universe that is largely hidden from telescopes sensitive only to visible light. In Chandra's Cosmos, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra science spokesperson Wallace H. Tucker uses a series of short, connected stories to describe the telescope's exploration of the hot, high-energy face of the universe. The book is organized in three parts: "The Big," covering the cosmic web, dark energy, dark matter, and massive clusters of galaxies; "The Bad," exploring neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes; and "The Beautiful," discussing stars, exoplanets, and life.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction. Cool Stories from the Hot Universe (p. 1)
  • Part I The Big
  • 1 Galaxy Clusters (p. 9)
  • 2 The Evidence for Dark Matter (p. 15)
  • 3 Cold Dark Matter (p. 25)
  • 4 Dark Matter Going Bananas (p. 35)
  • 5 The Wonderful-and Fearful-Dark Side (p. 43)
  • 6 What Is Dark Energy? (p. 55)
  • 7 The Cosmic Web (p. 61)
  • Part II The Bad
  • 8 Taking Pleasure in the Dimness of Stars (p. 71)
  • 9 Cygnus X-1, Microquasars, and the Galactic Jet Set (p. 81)
  • 10 Downtown Milky Way (p. 91)
  • 11 The Secret in the Middle (p. 101)
  • 12 Ducks Unlimited (p. 113)
  • 13 The Origin and Growth of Supermassive Black Holes (p. 121)
  • 14 Green Black Holes (p. 131)
  • 15 Black Hole Feedback (p. 143)
  • Part III The Beautiful
  • 16 Going Not Gentle into That Good Night (p. 159)
  • 17 Core Collapse (p. 177)
  • 18 The Crab and Other Pulsar Wind Nebulas (p. 189)
  • 19 A Thin Cosmic Rain: Particles from Outer Space (p. 203)
  • 20 Elemental Change (p. 213)
  • 21 Cosmic Renewal (p. 225)
  • References (p. 239)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 255)
  • Index (p. 256)
  • Photography and Illustration Credits (p. 264)

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