The Manson women and me : monsters, morality, and murder /

by Meredith, Nikki [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Citadel Press/Kensington Publishing Corp., [2018]Description: xiv, 351 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780806538587; 0806538589.Other title: Monsters, morality, and murder : the Manson women and me.Subject(s): Van Houten, Leslie, 1949- | Krenwinkel, Patricia | Manson, Charles, 1934-2017 -- Friends and associates -- Biography | Meredith, Nikki | Women prisoners -- California -- Biography | Women murderers -- California -- Biography | Ex-cultists -- California -- Biography | Nonfiction | Biography
Contents:
Leslie Van Houten -- Patricia Krenwinkel -- Nikki Meredith.
Summary: In the summer of 1969, Leslie Van Houten and Patricia Krenwinkel carried out horrific acts of butchery on the orders of the charismatic cult leader Charles Manson. At their murder trial the following year, lead prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi described the two so-called Manson Women as “human monsters.” But to anyone who knew them growing up, they were bright, promising girls, seemingly incapable of such an unfathomable crime. Award-winning journalist Nikki Meredith began visiting Van Houten and Krenwinkel in prison to discover how they had changed during their incarceration. The more Meredith got to know them, the more she was lured into a deeper dilemma: What compels “normal” people to do unspeakable things? The author’s relationship with her subjects provides a chilling lens through which we gain insight into a particular kind of woman capable of a particular kind of brutality. Through their stories, Nikki Meredith takes readers on a dark journey into the very heart of evil.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In 1969, Leslie Van Houten and Patricia Krenwinkel carried out horrific acts of butchery on the orders of cult leader Charles Manson. At their murder trial, the lead prosecutor described them as 'human monsters.' But to anyone who knew them growing up, they were bright, promising girls, seemingly incapable of such an crime. Award-winning journalist Nikki Meredith began visiting them in prison to discover how they had changed during their incarceration. The more Meredith got to know them, the more she was lured into a deeper dilemma: What compels 'normal' people to do unspeakable things?

Leslie Van Houten -- Patricia Krenwinkel -- Nikki Meredith.

In the summer of 1969, Leslie Van Houten and Patricia Krenwinkel carried out horrific acts of butchery on the orders of the charismatic cult leader Charles Manson. At their murder trial the following year, lead prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi described the two so-called Manson Women as “human monsters.” But to anyone who knew them growing up, they were bright, promising girls, seemingly incapable of such an unfathomable crime. Award-winning journalist Nikki Meredith began visiting Van Houten and Krenwinkel in prison to discover how they had changed during their incarceration. The more Meredith got to know them, the more she was lured into a deeper dilemma: What compels “normal” people to do unspeakable things? The author’s relationship with her subjects provides a chilling lens through which we gain insight into a particular kind of woman capable of a particular kind of brutality. Through their stories, Nikki Meredith takes readers on a dark journey into the very heart of evil.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Foreword (p. xi)
  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1 The Formosa Café (p. 9)
  • 2 Abigail Folger's Smile (p. 16)
  • 3 "Healter Skelter" (p. 21)
  • 4 Banned-Tools of the Trade (p. 25)
  • 5 Unfathomable Remorse (p. 27)
  • 6 Wallet on the Beach (p. 33)
  • 7 Mrs. Tate's Fury (p. 37)
  • 8 Living Without Hope (p. 40)
  • 9 Orphaned by the Holocaust (p. 44)
  • 10 Mondo Video A-Go-Go (p. 55)
  • 11 Disordered Thoughts and Demented Machinations (p. 61)
  • 12 "I Felt Like a Predator" (p. 66)
  • 13 Folie à famille (p. 69)
  • 14 Falling in Love with Anne Frank (p. 74)
  • 15 Everybody Can Be a Killer (p. 82)
  • 16 "Is There Anything Worse Than Dying in Terror?" (p. 88)
  • 17 The Empathic Brain (p. 91)
  • 18 Unforgetting Retribution (p. 96)
  • 19 Dues-Paying Member of the Little Wildlife Society (p. 98)
  • 20 "They Were on a Tear" (p. 104)
  • 21 Dreaming of Hitler (p. 107)
  • 22 The Need for a Scapegoat (p. 109)
  • 23 An Abiding Friend to Families of Victims (p. 114)
  • 24 The Agony of Mothers (p. 117)
  • 25 Homecoming Princess (p. 122)
  • 26 A Good Soldier (p. 126)
  • 27 Searching for a Cessna (p. 133)
  • 28 The Metaphorical Microscope (p. 142)
  • 29 Decoding Manson (p. 151)
  • 30 Broken Empathy Circuit (p. 154)
  • 31 "Leslie Is My Daughter" (p. 160)
  • 32 Ich bin ein Jude (p. 164)
  • 33 Bad Apples or Bad Barrel? (p. 169)
  • 34 A Psychedelic City-State (p. 173)
  • 35 "Eenie, Meenie, Miney, Mo" (p. 182)
  • 36 Micheltorena Hill (p. 188)
  • 37 Mule Creek Prison (p. 192)
  • 38 Every Facet of Her Mothering (p. 202)
  • 39 A Lethal Convergence (p. 209)
  • 40 "You Couldn't Find a Nicer Group of People" (p. 212)
  • 41 Pat's Anger (p. 215)
  • 42 Scapegoats-The Need to Blame (p. 220)
  • 43 "She Did Appeal to My Humanity but I Had None to Give Her" (p. 229)
  • 44 The Hole-in-the-Wall Gang (p. 232)
  • 45 Heaven's Gate (p. 238)
  • 46 A Different Pat (p. 241)
  • 47 The Terror of Being Excluded (p. 243)
  • 48 Hatred More Powerful Than a Mother's Love (p. 245)
  • 49 The Shade Trees of Hollywood High (p. 251)
  • 50 Fused Identities (p. 255)
  • 51 A Drop of Jewish Blood (p. 258)
  • 52 A Make-Believe Dodge (p. 270)
  • 53 "A Damn Good Whacking" (p. 275)
  • 54 The Swastika (p. 278)
  • 55 Yes, She Would Kill for Him (p. 280)
  • 56 Insatiable and Warped Need for Love (p. 282)
  • 57 The Ultimatum (p. 284)
  • 58 The Truth Is, the Truth Doesn't Matter (p. 288)
  • 59 Not That Kind of Girl (p. 299)
  • 60 We Are All Rwandan (p. 311)
  • 61 "You Took God Away from Me" (p. 314)
  • 62 Unforgetting, Unforgiving (p. 320)
  • 63 "I'd Be Nice to a Stray Dog If It Needed Help" (p. 326)
  • 64 The Mothers Who Poisoned Their Babies at Jonestown Haunt Her (p. 331)
  • 65 Starlight Ballroom (p. 336)
  • Epilogue (p. 341)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 349)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">When the killers were ultimately identified, the dread only intensified. Manson, the mastermind of the carnage, was scary. But the young women he controlled didn't look like anyone's idea of cold-blooded murderers. They looked like our sisters, our daughters, our friends--ourselves--and yet their bloodthirsty behavior was something out of a horror movie. Twenty years ago, I began visiting Leslie Van Houten and Patricia Krenwinkel in prison. I wanted to know if these women were radically different from the young women who carried out Charles Manson's barbaric orders in 1969. If they were different, how did they understand what happened? In grappling with the brutality of the events, I learned a great deal about human behavior, much of it disheartening, but some of it proof of our capacity as humans to transform ourselves, even those of us who have committed unspeakable acts. Excerpted from The Manson Women and Me: Monsters, Morality, and Murder by Nikki Meredith All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

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