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1944 diary /

by Keilson, Hans [author.]; Searls, Damion [translator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017.Edition: First American edition.Description: xix, 227 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 20 cm.ISBN: 9780374535599; 0374535590.Other title: One thousand nine hundred forty-four diary.Uniform titles: Tagebuch 1944. English.Subject(s): Keilson, Hans, 1909-2011 -- Diaries | Authors, German -- 20th century -- Diaries | Jews, German -- Netherlands -- Diaries | World War, 1939-1945 -- Netherlands -- Delft | World War, 1939-1945 -- Underground movements -- Netherlands | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Jewish | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Dutch | Netherlands -- History -- German occupation, 1940-1945 | Sonnets, German | BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY -- Personal Memoirs | HISTORY -- Jewish | HISTORY -- Holocaust | Poetry | Personal narratives | Diaries | History | Personal narratives -- Dutch | Personal narratives -- Jewish | Diaries | Personal narratives | Poetry
Contents:
Introduction -- People -- Diary -- Sonnets -- Afterword.
Scope and content: "An account of the Nazi-occupied Netherlands from one of Europe's most powerful chroniclers of the Holocaust. In 2010, FSG published two novels set in World War II by the German Jewish psychoanalyst Hans Keilson: The Death of the Adversary (1959) and Comedy in a Minor Key (1944). With their Chekhovian sympathy for perpetrators and bystanders as much as for victims and resisters, they were, as Francine Prose raved on the front page of The New York Times Book Review, 'masterpieces' by 'a genius.' After Keilson's death at age 101, a diary was found among his papers covering nine months in hiding with members of a Dutch resistance group. It tells the story not only of Keilson's survival but also of the moral and artistic life he was struggling to make for himself. Along with Keilsonesque set pieces--such as an encounter with a pastor who is sick of having to help Jews, and a day locked upstairs during a Nazi roundup in the city--the diary is full of reading notes on Kafka, Rilke, Céline, Buber, and others. Forcibly separated from his wife and young child, Keilson was having a passionate love affair with a younger Jewish woman in hiding a few blocks away, and writing dozens of sonnets to her, struggling with claims of morality and of love. 1944 Diary is a revelatory new angle on an often-told history and the work of one of Europe's most important novelists at a key moment of the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Jewish Book Month/Authors
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Biography BIO KEI, H. Available 39270004714543

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> [ 1944 Diary ] is a deeply personal account, made even more remarkable that it was written during World War II and the horrors of the Holocaust . . . A moving and fascinating read." -- Library Journal </p> <p>In 2010, FSG published two novels by the German- Jewish writer Hans Keilson: Comedy in a Minor Key --written in 1944 while Keilson was in hiding in the Netherlands, first published in German in 1947, and never before in English--and The Death of the Adversary , begun in 1944 and published in 1959, also in German. With their Chekhovian sympathy for perpetrators and bystanders as well as for victims and resisters, Keilson's novels were, as Francine Prose said on the front page of The New York Times Book Review , "masterpieces" by "a genius" on her list of "the world's very greatest writers." Keilson was one hundred years old, alive and well and able to enjoy his belated fame.</p> <p> 1944 Diary , rediscovered among Keilson's papers shortly after his death, covers nine months he spent in hiding in Delft with members of a Dutch resistance group, having an affair with a younger Jewish woman in hiding a few blocks away and striving to make a moral and artistic life for himself as the war and the Holocaust raged around him. For readers familiar with Keilson's novels as well as those new to his work, this diary is an incomparable spiritual X-ray of the mind and heart behind the art:a record of survival and creativity in what Keilson called "the most critical year of my life."</p> <p>Offering further insight into Keilson are the sonnets he wrote for his lover, Hanna Sanders, which appear in translation at the back of this volume.</p>

"Originally published in German in 2014 by S. Fischer, Germany, as Tagebuch 1944"--Title page verso.

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction -- People -- Diary -- Sonnets -- Afterword.

"An account of the Nazi-occupied Netherlands from one of Europe's most powerful chroniclers of the Holocaust. In 2010, FSG published two novels set in World War II by the German Jewish psychoanalyst Hans Keilson: The Death of the Adversary (1959) and Comedy in a Minor Key (1944). With their Chekhovian sympathy for perpetrators and bystanders as much as for victims and resisters, they were, as Francine Prose raved on the front page of The New York Times Book Review, 'masterpieces' by 'a genius.' After Keilson's death at age 101, a diary was found among his papers covering nine months in hiding with members of a Dutch resistance group. It tells the story not only of Keilson's survival but also of the moral and artistic life he was struggling to make for himself. Along with Keilsonesque set pieces--such as an encounter with a pastor who is sick of having to help Jews, and a day locked upstairs during a Nazi roundup in the city--the diary is full of reading notes on Kafka, Rilke, Céline, Buber, and others. Forcibly separated from his wife and young child, Keilson was having a passionate love affair with a younger Jewish woman in hiding a few blocks away, and writing dozens of sonnets to her, struggling with claims of morality and of love. 1944 Diary is a revelatory new angle on an often-told history and the work of one of Europe's most important novelists at a key moment of the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In 1944, during the German occupation of the Netherlands, Jewish German/Dutch novelist Keilson (Life Goes On) was a budding writer and psychologist living in hiding. He kept a diary through most of 1944, which was only discovered after his death in 2011. The diary is a deeply personal account, made even more remarkable that it was written during World War II and the horrors of the Holocaust. Keilson recounts his complicated personal life; separated from his wife and young daughter, he was having an affair with a younger woman. He also extensively documents his struggle to reconcile his desire to write with his determination to become a doctor. The war is present in occasional comments-rumors of the English arrival in the Netherlands, notes about other Jews in hiding, the sound of distant bombs-especially in one lengthy entry written while he could hear German soldiers outside on the street rounding up Jews and conscripts. VERDICT A moving and fascinating read. Fans of Keilson's novels should definitely seek out this account of his development, as should readers interested in writers' memoirs or the daily experiences of Jews in Europe during World War II.-Nicholas Graham, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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