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Nopalito : a Mexican kitchen /

by Guzmán, Gonzalo González [author.]; Adimando, Stacy [author.]; Kolenko, Eva [photographer.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: California : Ten Speed Press, [2017]Edition: First edition.Description: xiii, 241 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 27 cm.ISBN: 9780399578281; 0399578285.Subject(s): Nopalito (Restaurant) | Cooking, Mexican | Cookbooks | Nonfiction
Contents:
Background and basics: from Mexico to your kitchen -- Platillos pequeños (small plates) -- Platillos fuertes (big plates) -- Bebidas y postres (drinks & desserts) -- Nopalito salsas.
Summary: "A collection of 100 recipes for anyone who wants to cook traditional Mexican food in all its surprising freshness and variety, ranging from the simplest dishes to more complex ones, and including both the classic and the lesser-known regional gems of this cuisine. Nopalito provides a snapshot of regional Mexican cuisine from the perspective of Gonzalo Guzman, head chef at San Francisco's popular restaurant of the same name. With recipes for 100 traditional Mexican dishes (but through a California lens) from Puebla, Mexico City, Michoacan, the Yucatan, and beyond--including many recipes from the author's hometown of Veracruz--this beautifully photographed cookbook brings the warmth of Mexican cooking into the kitchens of home cooks. The book includes fundamental techniques of Mexican cuisine, insights into Mexican food and culture, and favorite recipes from Nopalito"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Latin American Cookbooks Awards: Click to open in new window
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 641.5972 GUZ Available 39270004702217

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A collection of 100 recipes for anyone who wants to cook traditional Mexican food in all its surprising freshness and variety, ranging from the simplest dishes to more complex ones, and including both the classic and the lesser-known regional gems of this cuisine.<br> <br> Nopalito provides a snapshot of regional Mexican cuisine from the perspective of Gonzalo Guzman, head chef at San Francisco's popular restaurant of the same name. With recipes for 100 traditional Mexican dishes (but through a California lens) from Puebla, Mexico City, Michoacan, the Yucatan, and beyond--including many recipes from the author's hometown of Veracruz--this beautifully photographed cookbook brings the warmth of Mexican cooking into the kitchens of home cooks. The book includes fundamental techniques of Mexican cuisine, insights into Mexican food and culture, and favorite recipes from Nopalito. <br>

Background and basics: from Mexico to your kitchen -- Platillos pequeños (small plates) -- Platillos fuertes (big plates) -- Bebidas y postres (drinks & desserts) -- Nopalito salsas.

"A collection of 100 recipes for anyone who wants to cook traditional Mexican food in all its surprising freshness and variety, ranging from the simplest dishes to more complex ones, and including both the classic and the lesser-known regional gems of this cuisine. Nopalito provides a snapshot of regional Mexican cuisine from the perspective of Gonzalo Guzman, head chef at San Francisco's popular restaurant of the same name. With recipes for 100 traditional Mexican dishes (but through a California lens) from Puebla, Mexico City, Michoacan, the Yucatan, and beyond--including many recipes from the author's hometown of Veracruz--this beautifully photographed cookbook brings the warmth of Mexican cooking into the kitchens of home cooks. The book includes fundamental techniques of Mexican cuisine, insights into Mexican food and culture, and favorite recipes from Nopalito"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface: The Gonzalo Effect (p. viii)
  • Introductions (p. x)
  • Background and Basics: From Mexico to Your Kitchen
  • In the Mexican Kitchen (p. 3)
  • Building the Mexican Pantry (p. 7)
  • A Few House Recipes (p. 31)
  • Queso Fresco (p. 32)
  • Nopalito Spices (p. 35)
  • Crema (p. 35)
  • Teleras (p. 36)
  • Mexican Sandwich Rolls
  • Cemitas (p. 38)
  • Sesame Sandwich Rolls
  • Escabeche Rojo (p. 39)
  • Pickled Red Onions
  • Jalapeños Curtidos (p. 39)
  • Pickled Jalapenos
  • Curtidos "Para Tacos" (p. 40)
  • Pickled Vegetables
  • Chipotles Adobados (p. 42)
  • Chipotles in Adobo Sauce
  • Mayonnaise (p. 43)
  • Maiz para Pozole (p. 43)
  • Hominy
  • Chorizo Oaxaqueño (p. 44)
  • Spiced Peanuts (p. 45)
  • Recommended Tools (and some extras that are nice to have) (p. 46)
  • Platillos Pequeños (Small Plates)
  • Ceviche Nayarita de Camarón (p. 54)
  • Shrimp Ceviche from Nayarit
  • Ceviche de Camarón y Cangrejo à la Mexicana (p. 57)
  • Shrimp and Crab Ceviche with Tomatoes, Onions, and Jalapeños
  • Ceviche de Pescado con Chile Guajillo (p. 60)
  • Halibut Ceviche with Red Chiles
  • Ceviche Verde de Pescado y Calamari (p. 61)
  • Green Ceviche with White Fish and Calamari
  • Garbanzos con Chile (p. 63)
  • Fried Chickpeas with Chill Powder
  • Totopos con Chile (p. 64)
  • Baked Tortilla Chips Tossed with Spicy Salsa de Arbal
  • Guacamole (p. 69)
  • Queso Flameado con Chorizo y Nopaies (p. 70)
  • Hot Oaxacan and Jack Cheese Dip with Chorizo and Cactus
  • Ensalada de Frutas (p. 73)
  • Fruit Salad with Chile and Lime
  • Ensalada de Nopaies (p. 74)
  • Cactus Leaf Salad
  • Ensalada de Pepinos y Verdolagas (p. 77)
  • Cucumber and Purslane Salad
  • Ensalada de Lechuga con Manzana (p. 78)
  • Little Gem Salad with Apples and Jalapeño Vinaigrette
  • Esquite Tostado con Crema y Queso (p. 81)
  • Toasted Corn with Crema, Ground Chile, and Queso Fresco
  • Quesadillas con Repollo de Bruselas (p. 82)
  • Quesadillas with Brussels Sprouts and Cascabel Chile Oil
  • Quesadillas de Esparagos con Salsa de Cilantro (p. 85)
  • Asparagus Quesadillas with Salsa Cilantro
  • Quesadillas Rojas con Chicharrónes (p. 86)
  • Crispy Red Quesadillas with Braised Red Pork and Pork Rinds
  • Tacos de Cochinita (p. 91)
  • Marinated Shredded Pork Tacos
  • Tacos de Pescado al Pastor (p. 95)
  • Fish Tacos Marinated in Adobo
  • Tamales de Amariilo con Camote (p. 96)
  • Sweet Potato Tamales with Mole Amarillo
  • Tamales de Birria con Pollo (p. 103)
  • Tamales with Stewed Chicken
  • Tamales Empipianados (p. 106)
  • Tamales with Red Spiced Sunflower Seed Mole
  • Empanadas de Deshebrada de Res (p. 108)
  • Fried Beef Empanadas
  • Empanadas de Camarón (p. 110)
  • Fried White Shrimp Empanadas
  • Empanadas de Flor de Calabaza (p. 111)
  • Fried Empanadas with Squash Blossoms
  • Gorditas de Papas con Chorizo (p. 113)
  • Potato Gorditas with Chorizo
  • Huaraches de Huitlacoche y Hongos (p. 114)
  • Blue Corn Huaraches with "Corn Truffle" and Mushrooms
  • Tostadas de Picadillo (p. 117)
  • Ground Beef Tostadas
  • Tostadas de Tlnga Poblana (p. 118)
  • Chicken Tinga Tostadas
  • Panuchos de Pollo (p. 121)
  • Black Bean-Stuffed Tortillas with Shredded Chicken
  • Arroz Mexicano (p. 122)
  • Mexican Rice
  • Frijoles Pinquitos de la Olla (p. 125)
  • Braised Pinquito Beans
  • Frijoles Pinquitos Refritos (p. 126)
  • Refried Pinquito Beans
  • Frijoles Negros de la Olla (p. 126)
  • Braised Black Beans
  • Frijoles Negros Refritos (p. 127)
  • Refried Black Beans
  • Vegetales con Aceite de Chile Cascabel (p. 128)
  • Roasted Vegetables in Cascabel Chile Oil
  • Platillos Fuertes (Big Plates)
  • Chilaquiles Rojos con Huevos (p. 135)
  • Red Chilaquiles with Scrambled Eggs
  • Huevos de Caja (p. 136)
  • Frijoles Puercos con Huevos (p. 139)
  • Pork-Braised Butter Beans with Scrambled Eggs
  • Machaca de Camarón con Huevos (p. 140)
  • Smashed Shrimp with Eggs and Salsa
  • Guisado de Res de Pasilla (p. 141)
  • Stewed Beef with Pasilla Chiles
  • Caldo Tlalpeñoron Pollo (p. 143)
  • Clear Chicken and Vegetable Soup from Tlalpeño
  • Pozole Rojo (p. 144)
  • Red Pork Soup with Hominy
  • Sopa de Pollo con Fideos (p. 147)
  • Chicken Soup with Fried Noodles
  • Tesmole de Mariscos (p. 148)
  • Spicy Seafood Soup
  • Birria al Res (p. 151)
  • Short Rib Stew
  • Bisteces à la Mexicana (p. 153)
  • Mexican-Style Stewed Steak
  • Carne Asada con Chorizo (p. 155)
  • Grilled Steak with Chorizo
  • Carnitas (p. 156)
  • Trucha Adobada en Hoja de Platano (p. 159)
  • Adobo-Rubbed Trout in Banana Leaves
  • Tortas Pambazos (p. 160)
  • Salsa-Dipped, Griddied Chorizo and Potato Sandwiches
  • Tortas de Chilorio (p. 163)
  • Adobo-Braised Pork Sandwiches
  • Gemita Poblana de Milanesa (p. 164)
  • Breaded Chicken Sandwiches with Sesame Rolls
  • Enchiladas Rojas de Camarón (p. 167)
  • Red Shrimp Enchiladas
  • Enchiladas de Mole Poblano (p. 170)
  • Chicken Enchiladas with Mole Poblano
  • Enchiladas Vegetarianas (p. 174)
  • Vegetable Enchiladas with Cilantro Salsa
  • Enmoladas de Coloradito (p. 177)
  • Tortillas in Mole Coloradito with Sesame and Onion
  • Costillas de Puerco en Salsa Verde con Nopales (p. 178)
  • Stewed Pork Ribs and Cactus with Salsa Verde
  • Ensalada de Repollo (p. 179)
  • Sliced Cabbage Salad
  • Bebidas y Postres (Drinks & Desserts)
  • Hordiata (p. 184)
  • Agua de Jamaica (p. 186)
  • Hibiscus and Valencia Orange Agua Fresca
  • Limonada de Limón y Gengibre (p. 186)
  • Ginger Limeade
  • Limonada de Limon y Fresa (p. 187)
  • Strawberry Limeade
  • Iced Cafe de la Olla (p. 189)
  • Mexican Spiced feed Coffee
  • Chocolate con Chiles (p. 190)
  • Hot Chocolate with Chiles
  • Killer Bee (p. 193)
  • El Diablo (p. 193)
  • Margarita (p. 194)
  • Mezcal Paloma (p. 197)
  • Blanco Rojo (p. 198)
  • Mexican Coffee (p. 198)
  • Bloody Maria (p. 201)
  • Flan Napolitano (p. 202)
  • Churros Mexicanos (p. 205)
  • Polvorones (p. 206)
  • Mexican Wedding Cookies
  • Camote Enmielado (p. 209)
  • Candied Sweet Potatoes
  • Paletas de Café con Leche (p. 210)
  • Coffee and Milk Popsicles
  • Paletas de Chocolate (p. 210)
  • Chocolate-Cinnamon Popsicles
  • Paletas de Limón con Crema (p. 213)
  • Lime Sherbet Popsicles
  • Paletas de Fresas (p. 213)
  • Strawberry Popsicles
  • Paletas de Mango con Chile (p. 213)
  • Spicy Mango Popsicles
  • Nopalito Salsas
  • Salsa Macha (p. 218)
  • Salsa Cilantro (p. 218)
  • Habanero Salsa (p. 221)
  • Salsa de Morita con Tomatillo (p. 221)
  • Saisa de Morita (p. 222)
  • Salsa Frita de Árbol (p. 222)
  • Salsa Cruda (p. 223)
  • Salsa Frita de GuajUto (p. 227)
  • Salsa de Tomatillo y Jalapeño (p. 227)
  • Salsa Escabeche (p. 228)
  • Salsa Borracha (p. 228)
  • Salsa Chiltomate (p. 230)
  • Salsa de Serrano y Tomatillo (p. 231)
  • Salsa "Bufalo" (p. 231)
  • Salsa de Árbol (p. 233)
  • Salsa Guajillo (p. 233)
  • Pequin Hot Sauce (p. 234)
  • Gracias (p. 237)
  • Index (p. 238)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">IN THE MEXICAN KITCHEN Many of the food traditions of Mexico historically revolved around three very simple pillars:  We ate mostly what we could grow ourselves.  We preserved what we grew, through drying, pickling, and other techniques.  We used all parts of everything we had access to, from the husks of the corn cobs to the fat from the animals.  We had little choice but to eat ingredients that were in season or to eat food that was grown locally. These options were based not on values but on necessity, as it was all many of us could afford. If you look at it this way, the key ingredients and ideas of Mexican cooking will seem like mostly common sense, and they are really not hard to understand or intimidating to master. Still, introducing them into your kitchen can open up a whole new world of flavors.  There are some cuisines that tout simplicity and integrity of ingredients as important above all else, and while Mexican ingredients may seem simplistic, what surprises many people about cooking authentic Mexican food is the intricacy, variety, and layers of flavor involved. For instance, the drying, then burning of chiles; the soaking and grinding of corn into masa; the blending of spices and herbs together to create a balanced salsa or mole--they all contribute to a nuanced and layered characteristic of the cuisine. Mexican food is, at heart, a labor-intensive style of cuisine from a hardworking people. To me, it is far too rare to see a restaurant or a home cook go the extra mile to transform simple ingredients, and that is why I felt inspired to open Nopalito--and to write this book.  Another part of the inspiration was to offer what I think is a glimpse into the true spirit, roots, and flavors of regional Mexican cooking. In the United States there is this idea that all Mexican meals start with chips and salsa, and that everything is laden with lard or cheese and comes with a side of rice and beans. But throughout my childhood in Mexico, our tables were spread with many dishes-- most of them fresh, colorful, and inspired by what came straight from the sea and the land that day. The dishes that we ate in our homes every day are alive and well in these pages.  CURTIDOS "PARA TACOS" Pickled Vegetables Makes about 4 cups Open the fridge of any Mexican home cook or chef, and you will find a jar or two of pickled vegetables. Traditionally, they are made with whatever vegetables are on hand, and the brine usually has a sweet-spicy quality from a combination of jalapeños and a little sugar. We call this style of chopped pickled vegetables para tacos because of their petite size--the idea is that you can spoon these pickles right on top of tacos, or eat little bites of them on the side. But they are delicious with any antojito. 11⁄2 cups carrots, halved lengthwise, then sliced into half moons 11⁄2 cups jalapeños, halved lengthwise, then sliced into half moons 11⁄2 cups small cauliflower florets (3⁄4-inch pieces) 1⁄4 white onion, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 cup white vinegar 1 tablespoon plus 11⁄2 teaspoons sugar 1 bay leaf 2 cloves garlic 1⁄2 teaspoon dried marjoram 3⁄4 teaspoon dried thyme 3⁄4 teaspoon ground allspice In a large bowl, combine the carrots, jalapeños, cauliflower, and onion; toss with the salt and let rest for 30 minutes. In a medium pot, combine 1 cup water with the vinegar, sugar, bay leaf, garlic, marjoram, thyme, and allspice and bring to a boil. Transfer the vegetables and salt to a 1-quart mason jar or comparable container. Pour the boiling vinegar mixture over the top and cover the jar with plastic wrap. Let cool slightly, then cover with a secure lid and let rest in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours before eating. Will keep for 2 to 4 weeks refrigerated. Excerpted from Nopalito: A Mexican Kitchen by Gonzalo Guzmán, Stacy Adimando All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Guzmán is the chef and co-owner of Nopalito, a Mexican restaurant in San Francisco. Writing with Saveur test kitchen director Adimando (The Cookiepedia), he shares 100 recipes for traditional Mexican foods, including shrimp ceviche from Mayarit, stewed pork ribs and cactus with salsa verde, sweet potato tamales with mole amarillo, and coffee and milk popsicles. For intermediate to advanced cooks who aspire to make everything from scratch, there are instructions for preparing homemade masa, tortillas, chips, salsas, breads, and pickles. Beautiful, rustic photographs appear throughout. VERDICT More challenging than low-effort or quick-and-easy offerings, Guzmán's compelling debut will appeal to foodies and Mexican food lovers who enjoy leisurely cooking. © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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