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Long way down /

by Reynolds, Jason [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Atheneum, [2017]Edition: First edition.Description: 306 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781481438254; 1481438255.Subject(s): Murder -- Juvenile fiction | Revenge -- Juvenile fiction | Ghost stories | Brothers -- Juvenile fiction | Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction | Novels in verse | Murder -- Fiction | Revenge -- Fiction | Ghosts -- Fiction | Brothers -- Fiction | Conduct of life -- Fiction | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Family | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Novels in Verse | YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Social Themes / Violence | Novels in verseSummary: There are three rules in the neighborhood: Don't cry ; Don't snitch ; Get revenge. Will takes his dead brother Shawn's gun, and gets in the elevator on the 7th floor. As the elevator stops on each floor, someone connected to Shawn gets on. Someone already dead. Dead by teenage gun violence. And each has something to share with Will.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult Fiction YA FIC REY (Browse shelf) Checked out 10/02/2019 39270004680751

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A Newbery Honor Book <br> A Coretta Scott King Honor Book <br> A Printz Honor Book <br> A Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner for Young Adult Literature <br> Longlisted for the National Book Award for Young People's Literature <br> Winner of the Walter Dean Myers Award <br> An Edgar Award Winner for Best Young Adult Fiction <br> Parents' Choice Gold Award Winner <br> An Entertainment Weekly Best YA Book of 2017 <br> A Vulture Best YA Book of 2017 <br> A Buzzfeed Best YA Book of 2017 <br> <br> An ode to Put the Damn Guns Down, this is National Book Award finalist and New York Times bestseller Jason Reynolds's fiercely stunning novel that takes place in sixty potent seconds--the time it takes a kid to decide whether or not he's going to murder the guy who killed his brother.<br> <br> A cannon. A strap.<br> A piece. A biscuit.<br> A burner. A heater.<br> A chopper. A gat.<br> A hammer<br> A tool<br> for RULE<br> <br> Or, you can call it a gun. That's what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge . That's where Will's now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother's gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he's after. Or does he? As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that's when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn's gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn't know that Shawn had ever actually USED his gun. Bigger huh. BUCK IS DEAD. But Buck's in the elevator? Just as Will's trying to think this through, the door to the next floor opens. A teenage girl gets on, waves away the smoke from Dead Buck's cigarette. Will doesn't know her, but she knew him. Knew. When they were eight. And stray bullets had cut through the playground, and Will had tried to cover her, but she was hit anyway, and so what she wants to know, on that fifth floor elevator stop, is, what if Will, Will with the gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, MISSES.<br> <br> And so it goes, the whole long way down, as the elevator stops on each floor, and at each stop someone connected to his brother gets on to give Will a piece to a bigger story than the one he thinks he knows. A story that might never know an END...if WILL gets off that elevator.<br> <br> Told in short, fierce staccato narrative verse, Long Way Down is a fast and furious, dazzlingly brilliant look at teenage gun violence, as could only be told by Jason Reynolds.

Young Adult

720 Lexile

Accelerated Reader 4.3

"A Caitlyn Dlouhy book."

There are three rules in the neighborhood: Don't cry ; Don't snitch ; Get revenge. Will takes his dead brother Shawn's gun, and gets in the elevator on the 7th floor. As the elevator stops on each floor, someone connected to Shawn gets on. Someone already dead. Dead by teenage gun violence. And each has something to share with Will.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Long Way Down DON'T NOBODY believe nothing these days which is why I haven't told nobody the story I'm about to tell you. And truth is, you probably ain't gon' believe it either gon' think I'm lying or I'm losing it, but I'm telling you, this story is true. It happened to me. Really. It did. It so did. Excerpted from Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

Fifteen-year-old Will, immobilized with grief when his older brother Shawn is shot and killed, slowly comes to mull The Rules in his head. There are three: dont cry, dont snitch, and if someone you love / gets killed, / find the person / who killed / them and / kill them. So Will locates Shawns gun, leaves his familys eighth-floor apartment, and--well, here is where this intense verse novel becomes a gripping drama, as on each floor of the descending elevator Will is joined by yet another victim or perpetrator in the chain of violence that took his brothers life. Shawns best friend Buck gets into the elevator on seven; Dani, Wills friend from childhood, gets in on six; Will and Shawns uncle Mark gets in on five, in a cloud of cigarette smoke. And so it goes, each stop of the elevator adding to the chorus of ghosts (including Will and Shawns father), each one with his or her perspective on The Rules. The poetry is stark, fluently using line breaks and page-turns for dramatic effect; the last of these reveals the best closing line of a novel this season. Read alone (though best aloud), the novel is a high-stakes moral thriller; its also a perfect if daring choice for readers theater. roger Sutton (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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