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How to kill a city : gentrification, inequality, and the fight for the neighborhood /

by Moskowitz, Peter [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Nation Books, [2017]Description: vii, 258 pages : maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781568585239; 1568585233.Subject(s): Gentrification -- United States | Equality -- United States | Urban poor -- United States | Middle class -- United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- City Planning & Urban Development | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Public Policy -- Regional Planning | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Sociology -- Urban
Contents:
pt. 1: New Orleans : Hanging on ; How gentrification works ; Destroy to rebuild -- pt. 2: Detroit : The new Detroit ; The 7.2 ; How the slate got blank -- pt. 2: San Francisco : The gentrified city ; Growth machine ; The new geography of inequality -- Pt . 4: New York : An elegy ; New York is not meant for people ; Fight back -- Conclusion: Toward an un-gentrified future.
Summary: "The term gentrification has become a buzzword to describe the changes in urban neighborhoods across the country, but we don't realize just how threatening it is. It means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance. Peter Moskowitz's How to Kill a City takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised. Along the way, Moskowitz uncovers the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification in New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York. The deceptively simple question of who can and cannot afford to pay the rent goes to the heart of America's crises of race and inequality. In the fight for economic opportunity and racial justice, nothing could be more important than housing. How to Kill a City reveals who holds power in our cities -- and how we can get it back."--Jacket.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 307.33 MOS Available 39270004597989

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A journey to the front lines of the battle for the future of American cities, uncovering the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification--and the lives that are altered in the process. <br> The term gentrification has become a buzzword to describe the changes in urban neighborhoods across the country, but we don't realize just how threatening it is. It means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance.<br> <br> Peter Moskowitz's How to Kill a City takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised. Along the way, Moskowitz uncovers the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification in New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York. The deceptively simple question of who can and cannot afford to pay the rent goes to the heart of America's crises of race and inequality. In the fight for economic opportunity and racial justice, nothing could be more important than housing.<br> <br> A vigorous, hard-hitting expose, How to Kill a City reveals who holds power in our cities-and how we can get it back<br> <br>

Includes bibliographical references (pages 221-245) and index.

pt. 1: New Orleans : Hanging on ; How gentrification works ; Destroy to rebuild -- pt. 2: Detroit : The new Detroit ; The 7.2 ; How the slate got blank -- pt. 2: San Francisco : The gentrified city ; Growth machine ; The new geography of inequality -- Pt . 4: New York : An elegy ; New York is not meant for people ; Fight back -- Conclusion: Toward an un-gentrified future.

"The term gentrification has become a buzzword to describe the changes in urban neighborhoods across the country, but we don't realize just how threatening it is. It means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance. Peter Moskowitz's How to Kill a City takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised. Along the way, Moskowitz uncovers the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification in New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York. The deceptively simple question of who can and cannot afford to pay the rent goes to the heart of America's crises of race and inequality. In the fight for economic opportunity and racial justice, nothing could be more important than housing. How to Kill a City reveals who holds power in our cities -- and how we can get it back."--Jacket.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction (p. 1)
  • Part 1 New Orleans (p. 13)
  • Chapter 1 Hanging On (p. 15)
  • Chapter 2 How Gentrification Works (p. 31)
  • Chapter 3 Destroy to Rebuild (p. 45)
  • Part 2 Detroit (p. 71)
  • Chapter 4 The New Detroit (p. 73)
  • Chapter 5 The 7.2 (p. 91)
  • Chapter 6 How the Slate Got Blank (p. 105)
  • Part 3 San Francisco (p. 123)
  • Chapter 7 The Gentrified City (p. 125)
  • Chapter 8 Growth Machine (p. 137)
  • Chapter 9 The New Geography of Inequality (p. 147)
  • Part 4 New York (p. 161)
  • Chapter 10 An Elegy (p. 163)
  • Chapter 11 New York Is not Meant for People (p. 181)
  • Chapter 12 Fight Back (p. 197)
  • Conclusion: Toward an Un-Gentrified Future (p. 209)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 219)
  • Notes (p. 221)
  • Index (p. 247)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Journalist Moskowitz visits four gentrifying American cities, where revitalization and displacement go hand in hand. Real estate developers buy old apartments and local businesses, city managers deal out rezoning and tax incentives to outsiders, and trendy millennials flock to San Francisco, New Orleans, New York, Detroit, and other gentrifying downtowns. Gentrification causes rents to skyrocket and locals-mostly low-income residents-to be displaced to the suburbs. Moskowitz exposes gentrification as systemic violence against low-income minorities that is rooted in historical inequalities and spearheaded by paternalistic developers and city officials who insist that displacement is the price of progress. The upshot is a "new geography of inequality." Moskowitz laments the decline of gritty urban communities and cultures, as well as the rise of inner cities that he characterizes as bland, affluent, and hipsteresque. He also touches on the growing global phenomenon in cities such as Berlin and London. This is a valuable entry text for deeper analyses found in Matthew Desmond's Evicted and Neil Smith's The New Urban Frontier. VERDICT A forceful critique of gentrification and its impact on disempowered members of American society. Relevant to anyone who values diverse cityscapes and socioeconomic justice.--Michael Rodriguez, Univ. of Connecticut © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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