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Ramona Blue /

by Murphy, Julie [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2017]Edition: First edition.Description: 408 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780062418357 : HRD; 0062418351 : HRD.Subject(s): Lesbians -- Fiction | Sexual orientation -- Fiction | Interpersonal relations -- Fiction | Family life -- Fiction | Mississippi -- FictionSummary: Struggling with family problems and still living in a FEMA trailer years after Hurricane Katrina, lesbian teenager Ramona welcomes the return of her childhood friend Freddie but her shifting feelings for him cause her to question her sexual identity.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult Fiction YA FIC MUR (Browse shelf) Available 39270004569087
Books Books Bob Lucas Memorial Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult Fiction BRANCH YA FIC MUR (Browse shelf) Available 39270003927740

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>The fourth novel from Julie Murphy, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dumplin'--now a Netflix feature film starring Danielle Macdonald and Jennifer Aniston, with a soundtrack by Dolly Parton!</p> <p>For fans of Rainbow Rowell and Morgan Matson, Julie Murphy has created another fearless heroine, Ramona Blue, in a gorgeously evocative novel about family, friendship, and how sometimes love can be more fluid than you first think.</p> <p>Ramona was only five years old when Hurricane Katrina changed her life forever.</p> <p>Since then, it's been Ramona and her family against the world. Standing over six feet tall with unmistakable blue hair, Ramona is sure of three things: she likes girls, she's fiercely devoted to her family, and she knows she's destined for something bigger than the trailer she calls home in Eulogy, Mississippi.</p> <p>But juggling multiple jobs, her flaky mom, and her well-meaning but ineffectual dad forces her to be the adult of the family. Now, with her sister, Hattie, pregnant, responsibility weighs more heavily than ever.</p> <p>The return of her childhood friend Freddie brings a welcome distraction. Ramona's friendship with the former competitive swimmer picks up exactly where it left off, and soon he's talked her into joining him for laps at the pool.</p> <p>But as Ramona falls in love with swimming, her feelings for Freddie begin to shift too, which is the last thing she expected. With her growing affection for Freddie making her question her sexual identity, Ramona begins to wonder if perhaps she likes girls and guys or if this new attraction is just a fluke.</p> <p>Either way, Ramona will discover that, for her, life and love are more fluid than they seem.</p>

Struggling with family problems and still living in a FEMA trailer years after Hurricane Katrina, lesbian teenager Ramona welcomes the return of her childhood friend Freddie but her shifting feelings for him cause her to question her sexual identity.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

Ramona Blue Leroux, nicknamed for her dyed-blue hair and love of the water (all kinds--oceans, lakes, pools), stands out in Eulogy, Mississippi. At six foot three, shes too tall for the trailer she lives in with her dad and pregnant sister. Shes also a lesbian, a fact thats accepted in Eulogy but one that limits her romantic options. Then her childhood friend Freddie moves back to town, and, to her surprise, Ramona discovers that shes attracted to him. Their ensuing relationship is passionate and unexpectedly natural: Kissing Freddie doesnt feel different because hes a boy, it feels different because hes Freddie. Ramonas subsequent refusal to label herself as gay, straight, or bisexual is refreshing, if unsubtly portayed, as is her frankness about sexuality: I think about sex. Girls think about sex. Sometimes a lot. I hate this ideas that boys are thinking about sex nonstop and girls are thinking about--what? Stationery and garden gnomes? No. Like Murphys heroine in Dumplin (rev. 11/15), Ramona is unapologetically herself. Set against a postHurricane Katrina backdrop, the novel also effectively explores issues of race (Freddie is black, Ramona is white), social class, and family responsibility. Ramona dreams of leaving Eulogy, but is resigned to staying to support her family; the satisfying ending gives her the courage, and the means, to look forward to an uncertain but optimistic future. rachel l. smith (c) Copyright 2017. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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