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The good, the great, and the unfriendly : a librarian's guide to working with friends groups /

by Reed, Sally Gardner [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago : ALA Editions, an imprint of the American Library Association, 2017.Description: ix, 157 pages ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780838914984 (pbk. : alk. paper).Other title: Librarian's guide to working with friends groups.Subject(s): Friends of the library -- United States -- Handbooks, manuals, etc | Friends of the library -- United States -- Case studies | Friends of the library | United States | Case studies | Handbooks and manuals
Contents:
How to start a friends group (and why you should!) -- Engaging active new (and younger) friends! -- Merging friends and foundations -- Engaging your friends in advocacy -- When friends go rogue -- Ideas to steal : taking your friends from good to great! -- Appendix A. Sample memorandum of understanding -- Appendix B. Advocacy campaigns legal limits on spending for non-profits -- Appendix C. Sponsorship and gift acceptance policy -- Appendix D. Understanding roles chart -- Appendix E. Guidelines for giving -- Appendix F. Making the case for an academic friends of the library group -- Appendix G. Library support for friends activities.
List(s) this item appears in: Love Your Library
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult New Arrivals 021.7 REE c. 2 (Browse shelf) Staff Collection 39270003905464
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 021.7 REE c. 1 (Browse shelf) Available 39270004550541

Includes index.

How to start a friends group (and why you should!) -- Engaging active new (and younger) friends! -- Merging friends and foundations -- Engaging your friends in advocacy -- When friends go rogue -- Ideas to steal : taking your friends from good to great! -- Appendix A. Sample memorandum of understanding -- Appendix B. Advocacy campaigns legal limits on spending for non-profits -- Appendix C. Sponsorship and gift acceptance policy -- Appendix D. Understanding roles chart -- Appendix E. Guidelines for giving -- Appendix F. Making the case for an academic friends of the library group -- Appendix G. Library support for friends activities.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgments (p. ix)
  • 1 How to Start a Friends Group (and Why You Should) (p. 1)
  • 2 Engaging Active New (and Younger) Friends (p. 23)
  • 3 Merging Friends and Foundations (p. 37)
  • 4 Engaging Your Friends in Advocacy (p. 49)
  • 5 When Friends Go Rogue (p. 59)
  • 6 Ideas to Steal-Taking Your Friends from Good to Great (p. 71)
  • Appendixes
  • A Sample Memorandum of Understanding (p. 133)
  • B Advocacy Campaigns: Legal Limits on Spending for Non-Profits (p. 135)
  • C Sponsorship and Gift Acceptance Policy (p. 137)
  • D Working Together: Roles and Responsibilities Guidelines (p. 140)
  • E Guidelines for Giving (p. 142)
  • F Making the Case for an Academic Friends of the Library Group (p. 144)
  • G Library Support for Friends Activities (p. 146)
  • Index (p. 149)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This slim handbook by Reed (executive director, United for Libraries; coauthor, The Complete Library Trustee Handbook) expands upon and updates her 2004 work, 101+ Great Ideas for Libraries and Friends. The question of why Friends of libraries are needed is addressed-the Internet has not made these institutions obsolete, the author points out, and libraries are often the only access for digital "have-nots." The nitty-gritty of working with Friends includes filing for tax exempt status, merging a group with a foundation, and working with volunteers. Friends groups supporting academic libraries, often overlooked, are given their share of attention. Friends of a library can fundraise, provide outreach, support programming, engage the community, and advocate for maintaining and increasing budgets. How to connect with new and younger Friends and volunteers is covered, although the use of social media could have been given more attention. Advice for how a library can divorce from a Friends group when things go bad provides guidance through a sticky situation, but a few in-depth examples would have been valuable. A chapter of fundraising and programming ideas rounds out the book. VERDICT Librarians and trustees interested in developing a library Friends group will find straightforward, practical advice in this guide.-Susan Belsky, Oshkosh P.L., WI © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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