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The lines we cross /

by Abdel-Fattah, Randa [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Scholastic Press, 2017.Edition: First [United States] edition.Description: 393 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781338118667; 1338118668.Uniform titles: When Michael met Mina.Subject(s): Refugees -- Australia -- Juvenile fiction | Muslim families -- Australia -- Juvenile fiction | Families -- Australia -- Juvenile fiction | Interpersonal attraction -- Juvenile fiction | Australia -- Ethnic relations -- Juvenile fiction | Australia -- Politics and government -- 21st century -- Juvenile literature | Refugees -- Fiction | Emigration and immigration -- Fiction | Muslims -- Australia -- Fiction | Family life -- Australia -- Fiction | Love -- Fiction | Ethnic relations -- Fiction | Australia -- Fiction | Ethnic relations | Families | Interpersonal attraction | Muslim families | Politics and government | Refugees | Australia | Refugees -- Australia -- Fiction | Ethnic relations -- Fiction | 2000-2099 | Fiction | Juvenile worksSummary: Michael's parents are leaders of a new anti-immigrant political party called Aussie Values which is trying to halt the flood of refugees from the Middle East; Mina fled Afghanistan with her family ten years ago, and just wants to concentrate on fitting in and getting into college--but the mutual attraction they feel demands that they come to terms with their family's concerns and decide where they stand in the ugly anti-Muslim politics of the time.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult Fiction YA FIC ABD (Browse shelf) Available 39270004578567

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>From one of the most important voices in contemporary Muslim literature comes a remarkable story about the power of choosing tolerance.</p> <p>Michael usually concerns himself with basketball and hanging out with his friends, but every once in a while, his parents drag him to meetings and rallies with their anti-immigrant group. And it all makes sense to Michael.</p> <p>Until Mina, a beautiful girl from the other side of the protest lines, shows up at his school, and turns out to be funny, smart - and a Muslim refugee from Afghanistan. Suddenly, his parents' politics seem much more complicated.</p> <p>Mina has already had a long and arduous journey leaving behind her besieged home in Afghanistan, and the frigid welcome at her new school is daunting. She just wants to settle in and help her parents get their restaurant up and running. But nothing about her new community will be that easy. As tensions increase, lines are drawn. Michael has to decide where he stands. Mina has to protect herself and her family. Both have to choose what they want their world to look like.</p>

"First published 2016 in Australia by Pan Macmillan Australia Pty Ltd ... Sydney, New South Wales, Australia."

Michael's parents are leaders of a new anti-immigrant political party called Aussie Values which is trying to halt the flood of refugees from the Middle East; Mina fled Afghanistan with her family ten years ago, and just wants to concentrate on fitting in and getting into college--but the mutual attraction they feel demands that they come to terms with their family's concerns and decide where they stand in the ugly anti-Muslim politics of the time.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Suddenly Dad's face breaks out into a grin. "Michael! Look!" I glance in the direction he's motioning and, noticing a reporter and cameraman, smile. "Your mum's press release must have worked." He runs his fingers through his thinning hair and readjusts the flag. "How do I look?" "Like the leader of a new political organization," I say proudly. "Who's sweltering under that thing. Don't forget it's all about the sound bites. Aussie Values aims to represent the silent majority blah blah. The kind of thing you and Mum were practicing last night." "We have about fifty members," Dad says with a grin. "In a population of twenty-three million, I wouldn't say that really constitutes a majority." He leans in close to me and winks conspiratorially. "But nobody needs to know that, hey, mate?" The chants of the other protestors are getting louder. Rick, from our side, starts up a chant in reply. Game on. The atmosphere is electric, and people are fired up on both sides. And then I see her. Her eyes. I've never seen eyes like hers before. What color are they? Hazel and green and flecks of autumn and bits of emerald and I'm standing holding my sign and there she is, standing steps away, near the cop, holding hers ( It's Not Illegal to Seek Asylum ), and all I can think about is how the hell I'm going to take my eyes off her. Her hair is jet black, hanging loose down her back, and I think hair that gorgeous has no business being on someone like her . She's wearing jeans and a plain white T-shirt. She's the most beautiful girl I've ever seen and it stupidly, inexplicably, throws me. Excerpted from The Lines We Cross by Randa Abdel-Fattah All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

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