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What have we done [sound recording] : the moral injury of our longest wars /

by Wood, David [author,]; Pittu, David [narrator.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelSoundPublisher: [Ashland, Oregon] : Blackstone Audio, [2016]Edition: Unabridged.Description: 9 audio discs (10 hr.) : CD audio, digital ; 4 3/4 in.ISBN: 1478943149; 9781478943143; 9781478943174; 1478943173.Subject(s): PSYCHOLOGY / Psychopathology / Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) | PHILOSOPHY / Ethics & Moral Philosophy | Veterans -- Mental health -- United States | Veteran reintegration | Post-traumatic stress disorder | War -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States | Combat -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States | Combat -- Psychological aspects | Military ethics -- United States | Combat -- Moral and ethical aspects | Combat -- Psychological aspects | Military ethics | Post-traumatic stress disorder | Veteran reintegration | Veterans -- Mental health | War -- Moral and ethical aspects | Audiobooks | Audiobooks | United StatesRead by David Wood and David Pittu.Summary: From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Wood, a battlefield view of moral injury, the signature wound of America's modern wars.Most Americans are now familiar with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among troops. In this groundbreaking new book, David Wood examines the far more pervasive yet less understood experience of those we send to war: moral injury, the violation of our fundamental values of right and wrong that so often occurs in the impossible moral dilemmas of modern conflict. Featuring portraits of combat veterans and leading mental health researchers, along with Wood's personal observations of war and the young Americans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, What Have We Done offers an unflinching look at war and those who volunteer for it--the thrill and pride of service and, too often, the scars of moral injury.Impeccably researched and deeply personal, What Have We Done is a compassionate, finely drawn study of modern war and those caught up in it. It is a call to acknowledge our newest generation of veterans by listening intently to them and absorbing their stories; and, as new wars approach, to ponder the inevitable human costs of putting American boots on the ground.
List(s) this item appears in: Veterans
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Audio Books Audio Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Audiobooks (Media Center) SBC C.D. 172.42 WOO Available 39270004545640

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Wood, a battlefield view of moral injury, the signature wound of America's modern wars.</p><p>Most Americans are now familiar with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among troops. In this groundbreaking new book, David Wood examines the far more pervasive yet less understood experience of those we send to war: moral injury, the violation of our fundamental values of right and wrong that so often occurs in the impossible moral dilemmas of modern conflict. Featuring portraits of combat veterans and leading mental health researchers, along with Wood's personal observations of war and the young Americans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, What Have We Done offers an unflinching look at war and those who volunteer for it-the thrill and pride of service and, too often, the scars of moral injury.</p><p>Impeccably researched and deeply personal, What Have We Done is a compassionate, finely drawn study of modern war and those caught up in it. It is a call to acknowledge our newest generation of veterans by listening intently to them and absorbing their stories; and, as new wars approach, to ponder the inevitable human costs of putting American boots on the ground.</p>

Read by David Wood and David Pittu.

Compact discs.

From Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Wood, a battlefield view of moral injury, the signature wound of America's modern wars.Most Americans are now familiar with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among troops. In this groundbreaking new book, David Wood examines the far more pervasive yet less understood experience of those we send to war: moral injury, the violation of our fundamental values of right and wrong that so often occurs in the impossible moral dilemmas of modern conflict. Featuring portraits of combat veterans and leading mental health researchers, along with Wood's personal observations of war and the young Americans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, What Have We Done offers an unflinching look at war and those who volunteer for it--the thrill and pride of service and, too often, the scars of moral injury.Impeccably researched and deeply personal, What Have We Done is a compassionate, finely drawn study of modern war and those caught up in it. It is a call to acknowledge our newest generation of veterans by listening intently to them and absorbing their stories; and, as new wars approach, to ponder the inevitable human costs of putting American boots on the ground.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The "collateral damage" of civilian death has been a feature of armed conflict for millennia, especially during the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Pultizer Prize-winning journalist Wood, who has served several tours as a foreign reporter for Time magazine and other publications, applies his investigative skills to the question of how the men and women of U.S. armed services have dealt with the emotional trauma of war and the moral consequences of intentional and unintentional injury to noncombatants in a war zone. Wood interviews several military personnel who share their stories, including the heavy burden they carry as a result of their experiences in the chaotic midst of violence that so often characterizes warfare in the modern era. The author asks readers to go beyond the act of parades and polite applause and make an effort to listen to our servicemen and -women as they describe the emotional and mental anguish they carry as a result of upholding their duties. VERDICT This powerful book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the life of a soldier after they return home from war.-Ed Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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