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Audacious kids : coming of age in America's classic children's books /

by Griswold, Jerome.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1992Description: xiv, 285 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0195058887 (acid-free paper) :.Title notes: c.1 $25.00 4-93Subject(s): Children's stories, American -- History and criticism | Children -- Books and reading
Contents:
There's no place but home : The wizard of Oz -- The long parricidal dream : Adventures of Huckleberry Finn -- Spinster aunt, sugar daddy, and child-woman : Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm -- Motherland, fatherland, or oedipal politics : Little Lord Fauntleroy -- Ur of the Ur-stories : Tarzan of the apes -- Impostors, succession, and faux histories : The prince and the pauper -- Remorse and regrets : The adventures of Tom Sawyer -- Bosom enemies : Little women -- Bread and circuses : Toby Tyler -- Sunny land, angry waters : Hans Brinker -- Positive thinking : The secret garden -- Radical innocence : Pollyanna.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 813.09 GRI Available 39270001798549

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Now often called the "Golden Age of Children's Books," the years stretching from the Civil War to World War I were a remarkable epoch in juvenile literature, an era when the best authors on both sides of the Atlantic--writers such as Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, Rudyard Kipling, and Charles Dickens--wrote some of their finest work primarily for children. It was an era in America that produced such timeless childhood classics as Little Women, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Wizard of Oz, The Secret Garden, Tarzan of the Apes, and Hans Brinker--books that remain an essential part of mainstream children's literature even to this day.<br> Now, in Audacious Kids, Jerry Griswold provides a groundbreaking study of twelve of these classic American children's tales, including not only the works mentioned above, but also such time-honored stories as Huckleberry Finn, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, Little Lord Fauntleroy, and Pollyanna. Griswold offers many intriguing insights into these works. For instance, he explains why the Wicked Witch is angry at Dorothy (for filling her shoes), how Huck Finn wishes to slay his father, and how Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm is a precursor of Lolita. His most remarkable insight is that, at bottom, these twelve books all tell essentially the same story: of a child who is orphaned, makes a journey, is adopted by harassing adults, triumphs over them, and comes into his or her own. Griswold also reveals that these tales emphasize certain motifs that are especially American, such as positive thinking, concern with health, and the concealment of sex and violence, and he shows how these secular parables replaced religion with psychology and preached gospels of emotional self-control and optimism.<br> When people are asked to name their favorite books, an astonishing number mention children's books. Grahame Greene once offered a reason for this. "It is only in childhood that books have any deep influence on our lives," Greene wrote. "What do we ever get nowadays from reading to equal the excitement and the revelation of those first fourteen years?" In Audacious Kids, Jerry Griswold provides the first book-length study of the great classics of American children's literature, a genre that has had a lasting impact on our lives.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 243-273) and index.

There's no place but home : The wizard of Oz -- The long parricidal dream : Adventures of Huckleberry Finn -- Spinster aunt, sugar daddy, and child-woman : Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm -- Motherland, fatherland, or oedipal politics : Little Lord Fauntleroy -- Ur of the Ur-stories : Tarzan of the apes -- Impostors, succession, and faux histories : The prince and the pauper -- Remorse and regrets : The adventures of Tom Sawyer -- Bosom enemies : Little women -- Bread and circuses : Toby Tyler -- Sunny land, angry waters : Hans Brinker -- Positive thinking : The secret garden -- Radical innocence : Pollyanna.

c.1 $25.00 4-93

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

American culture and national identity are both reflected in, and informed by, its writing for children. Griswold devotes a chapter each to a dozen novels from the Golden Age of American children's books (1865-1914). Huck, Rebecca, Oz, Fauntleroy, Tom Sawyer, Toby Tyler, Tarzan, Pollyanna, Hans Brinker, The Prince and the Pauper , Little Women , and The Secret Garden allow Griswold engagingly and originally to analyze the text itself and its interaction with the culture. A common ``ur-story'' is identified in the introduction, and to clarify its variants, the author uses the insights of a psychology shorn of jargon or narrowness. A cogent afterword reflects briefly on the current status of children's literature. Griswold writes clearly, convincingly, and even entertainingly. This thoughtful union of the scholarly and the readable deserves a very wide audience.-- Patricia Dooley, Univ. of Washington Lib. Sch., Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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