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Two if by sea /

by Mitchard, Jacquelyn.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2016.Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition.Description: 401 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781501115578 (hardcover); 150111557X (hardcover); 9781501115585 (softcover); 1501115588 (softcover).Subject(s): Widowers -- Fiction | Telepathy -- Fiction | Horses -- Therapeutic use -- Fiction | Thrillers (Fiction) | Suspense fictionSummary: "Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy goes out to join his volunteer rescue unit and pulls a little boy from a submerged car, saving the child's life with only seconds to spare. In that moment, Frank's own life is transformed. Not quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes the boy home to the Midwestern farm where he grew up. Not long into their journey, Frank begins to believe that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift; but his only wish is to protect the deeply frightened child. As Frank struggles to start over, training horses as his father and grandfather did before him, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life and his fears for Ian. Both of them know that it will be impossible to keep Ian's gift a secret forever. Already, ominous coincidences have put Frank's police instincts on high alert, as strangers trespass the quiet life at the family farm"--Goodreads.com.
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Adult Collection Adult Fiction FIC MIT Available 39270004502625

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Deep End of the Ocean , an epic story of courage and devotion that spans three continents and the entire map of the human heart.<br> <br> Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy goes out to join his volunteer rescue unit and pulls a little boy from a submerged car, saving the child's life with only seconds to spare. In that moment, Frank's own life is transformed. Not quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes the boy home to the Midwestern farm where he grew up. Not long into their journey, Frank begins to believe that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift; but his only wish is to protect the deeply frightened child. As Frank struggles to start over, training horses as his father and grandfather did before him, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life--and his fears for Ian. Both of them know that it will be impossible to keep Ian's gift a secret forever. Already, ominous coincidences have put Frank's police instincts on high alert, as strangers trespass the quiet life at the family farm.<br> <br> The fight to keep Ian safe from a sinister group who want him back takes readers from the ravaged shores of Brisbane to the middle of America to a quaint English village. Even as Frank and Claudia dare to hope for new love, it becomes clear that they can never let Ian go, no matter what the cost. A suspenseful novel on a grand scale, Two If by Sea is about the best and worst in people, and the possibility of heroism and even magic in ordinary life.

"Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy goes out to join his volunteer rescue unit and pulls a little boy from a submerged car, saving the child's life with only seconds to spare. In that moment, Frank's own life is transformed. Not quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes the boy home to the Midwestern farm where he grew up. Not long into their journey, Frank begins to believe that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift; but his only wish is to protect the deeply frightened child. As Frank struggles to start over, training horses as his father and grandfather did before him, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life and his fears for Ian. Both of them know that it will be impossible to keep Ian's gift a secret forever. Already, ominous coincidences have put Frank's police instincts on high alert, as strangers trespass the quiet life at the family farm"--Goodreads.com.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Two If by Sea ONE SO MANY THINGS happen when people can't sleep. It was always hot in Brisbane, but that night was pouty, unsettling. After getting Natalie and her family comfortable in their rooms at the inn, Frank couldn't rest. His leg plagued him. The toll of oppressive weather on that kind of old injury was no old farmer's myth. He rambled around, briefly joining Natalie's brother Brian in the bar on the beach, then painfully mounting the switchbacked decks of wooden stairs that led to a kind of viewing platform just adjacent to the car park, looking out over Bribie Island Beach. Up there, he hoped the signal would be good enough to call home, his home, if home is the place you started. For Frank, that would always be a ramshackle horse farm in south-central Wisconsin--now probably more ramshackle than when he last saw it, three years before. As the brrrrr on the other end began, his pulse quickened. He looked up at the sky and thought of all the calls darting through the sea of radio waves tonight, swift as swallows--dutiful, hopeful, wistful, sad. "Frank?" His sister, Eden, answered, her voice holiday-bright and holiday-brittle, suddenly next to him across nine thousand miles. He was about to ask her to summon his mother to the phone so they could all talk together when he saw it. Without thinking, and without another word to Edie, he let his phone slip into his jeans pocket. He could not figure out what it was. He would never remember it as a wave. Wave was too mere a word. Although there were hundreds of photos and pieces of film, some shot just at the moment, near this very spot, Frank could look at these and remain curiously unmoved. But should he close his eyes and let himself return, the sick sweats would sweep down his breastbone, a sluice of molten ice. He would hear again the single dog's one mournful howl, and feel the heavy apprehension, something like that moment from his days as a uniform cop when a routine traffic stop went completely to shit and a fist came flying in from nowhere, but monumentally worse. So much worse that it routed even imagination. Many years later, Frank would think, this was his first sight of the thing that would sweep away the center of his life in the minutes after midnight, and, by the time the sun rose, send surging into his arms the seed of his life to come. Just like that. Like some mythical deity with blind eyes that took and gave unquestioned. He saw the wave as a gleaming dam, built of stainless steel, standing upright in the misty moonlight, fifty feet tall and extending for half a mile in either direction. Then, as it collapsed in place, it was water, surging lustily forward and drowning every building on the beach, including the Murry Sand Castle Inn, where Frank's pregnant wife and her entire extended family lay asleep. For one breath, Frank saw the inn, its porch strung with merry lanterns, red and gold and green, and in the next breath, he saw everything disappear, every light go out, faster than it was possible to think the words that could describe it. He shouted, "No!" and stumbled forward to make his way down the high tiers of wooden stairs he had only just ascended. Hoarse, in the distance, another voice called, "No!" over a cascade of sound--the brittle pop of breaking glass, screams peppering the air like gunshot, and the throaty insistence of the water. Even as Frank turned, the mud-colored tide was boiling up the stairs and leaping the boardwalk barricade. He plunged forward, trying to wade against it, to find the riser of the wooden steps, but there was nothing; his foot bounced against water; he was soaked to the thigh. Pulling himself up along the top rail of the fence, for he would certainly be able to see something of the inn from there, or at least hear something, he shouted, "Natalie!" There were no voices. No lights except the milky smear from the hotels and office towers far in the distance to his left, like a frill of fallen stars. No sound except the insistent gossip of the water, and he was wet now to his waist. Grateful that he was still at least relatively young and passably fit, Frank hauled himself over the fence. He skip-sprinted across the car park, to their little Morris Mini-Minor. Water was already frothing around the tires. Frank pulled open the door, throwing himself into the seat, fumbling for his keys, quickly gaining the highway. He stopped again and got out. He heard a man's voice cry, "Help! Who's there . . . ?" and then again the swallowing silence. Floodwater rocked at the verge of the road; now how many feet above sea level? Of the two of them, Natalie was, pound for pound, by far the stronger, fitter, even tougher. Of the two of them, she was also the more intrepid, the more likely to have found some way to outsmart and elude this cliff of tides. They would find each other, and he did her no service by stalling here, forsaking his own life for no purpose. Natalie would have hated him for that. He floored it, racing inland. Miles sloughed away and he felt rather than saw the dark shapes of other cars congealing around him. At last, there was nowhere to move, and all the cars had to stop and Frank got out and walked. Others walked, too. An old man struggled under the weight of a gray-lipped girl. She was perhaps ten or eleven years old and her sweet, lifeless face had closed in a smile, her nose and eyes pouring saltwater tears. Frank saw a young woman wearing just one shoe. She clutched a bundle of wet clothes, among them a child's small jersey embroidered with cross-stitched Santas. A man Frank's own age sat sobbing near a great blooming evergreen frangipani. Frank avoided their eyes. He thought he might be able to get to a place where he could think, but he only walked farther. He met people hiking toward him, or saw them sitting in their cars, or standing still by the roadside, their hands like the pendulums of broken clocks. After some time, he came upon a large group gathered around a car whose young driver had removed his outsized speakers from the dash. A basso radio voice intoned, "Now you will hear that the tsunami happened because of climate change, friends. You will hear that it struck our coast because of a tropical storm deep in the Pacific. You will hear that this was a random event. But do you believe that? How can any man believe that it was coincidence that water swept into the Sodom of Brisbane on this very hallowed night? Intelligent people will say that we have failed to take care of our earth. But the Lord God Almighty does not care about the climate. He cares about the climate of our souls! As it says in Matthew, 'Therefore keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour.' And so it has come . . ." Frank walked around a curve in the road, and the preacher's voice faded to a series of thumps, like the bass notes of a song from a car passing the open window of Frank's childhood bedroom on the farm. A pale vein of light lolled on the horizon. It would soon be dawn, on Christmas morning. Excerpted from Two If by Sea: A Novel by Jacquelyn Mitchard All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

After Frank Mercy loses his wife in a tsunami in Australia, he rescues a small child from a car adrift in the floodwaters. In the absence of a family member to claim the boy-Ian-Frank keeps him. Together, they return to Frank's horse farm in the United States. Slowly, Frank realizes Ian has a special gift, and their increasing bond helps Frank heal from the loss of his wife. To complicate matters, a series of shadowy and dangerous people have followed Ian from Australia, intent on using his gift for their own gain. Frank must decide to what lengths he will go to protect Ian from harm. Verdict A slow start and overwrought prose in the first third of the novel give way to a genuinely moving story about the ties that bind families. Frank and Ian are carefully drawn characters, while the bad guys remain unsatisfactorily unexplained until the end. Mitchard (The Deep End of the Ocean) combines elements of suspense and the supernatural into a story both epic and intimate. Mitchard fans, as well as those of Jodi Picoult and Anita Shreve, will appreciate this affecting family drama. [See Prepub Alert, 9/28/15.]-Sarah Cohn, Manhattan Coll. Lib., Bronx, NY © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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