The only street in Paris : life on the Rue des Martyrs /

by Sciolino, Elaine.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Company, 2016.Description: xiii, 294 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780393242379 (hardcover); 0393242374 (hardcover).Subject(s): Rue des Martyrs (Paris, France) | Sciolino, Elaine -- Homes and haunts -- France -- Paris | Streets -- France -- Paris | Neighborhoods -- France -- Paris | Street life -- France -- Paris | Paris (France) -- Social life and customs | Americans -- France -- Paris -- Biography | Jewish women -- France -- Paris -- Biography | Paris (France) -- Description and travel | Paris (France) -- Biography
Contents:
The perfect street -- Searching for home -- Is fish necessary? -- Hidden in plain sight -- Wedding the crowd -- Now, this is butter! -- To catch a mouse -- The meaning of martyrdom -- Some of my favorite ghosts -- The knife sharpener -- Guess who's coming to passover? -- The murdered schoolgirls -- Cheaper than a psychiatrist -- In celebration of books -- The artisan with the golden touch -- Minister of the night -- The dive -- The Flying House of the Virgin Mary -- A street fit for a pope -- Le kale Américain est arrivé! -- The resurrection of fish -- Le potluck.
Scope and content: "Part memoir, part travelogue, part love letter to the people who live and work on a magical street in Paris. Elaine Sciolino, the former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, invites us on a tour of her favorite Parisian street, offering an homage to street life and the pleasures of Parisian living. 'I can never be sad on the rue des Martyrs,' Sciolino explains, as she celebrates the neighborhood's rich history and vibrant lives. While many cities suffer from the leveling effects of globalization, the rue des Martyrs maintains its distinct allure. On this street, the patron saint of France was beheaded and the Jesuits took their first vows. It was here that Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir painted circus acrobats, Émile Zola situated a lesbian dinner club in his novel Nana, and François Truffaut filmed scenes from The 400 Blows. Sciolino reveals the charms and idiosyncrasies of this street and its longtime residents--the Tunisian greengrocer, the husband-and-wife cheesemongers, the showman who's been running a transvestite cabaret for more than half a century, the owner of a hundred-year-old bookstore, the woman who repairs eighteenth-century mercury barometers--bringing Paris alive in all of its unique majesty. The Only Street in Paris will make readers hungry for Paris, for cheese and wine, and for the kind of street life that is all too quickly disappearing"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 944.361 SCI Available 39270004496836

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Elaine Sciolino, the former Paris bureau chief of The New York Times, invites us on a tour of her favourite Parisian street. "I can never be sad on the rue des Martyrs", Sciolino explains as she celebrates the area's rich history and vibrant lives. While many cities suffer from the levelling effects of globalisation, the rue des Martyrs maintains its distinct allure.</p> <p>Sciolino reveals the charms and idiosyncrasies of this street and its residents--the Tunisian greengrocer, the husband-and-wife cheesemongers, the showman who's been running a transvestite cabaret for more than half a century, the owner of a 100-year-old bookstore, the woman who repairs eighteenth-century mercury barometers--making Paris come alive in all its majesty. The Only Street in Paris will make readers hungry for Paris and for the kind of street life that is all too quickly disappearing.</p>

"Part memoir, part travelogue, part love letter to the people who live and work on a magical street in Paris. Elaine Sciolino, the former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, invites us on a tour of her favorite Parisian street, offering an homage to street life and the pleasures of Parisian living. 'I can never be sad on the rue des Martyrs,' Sciolino explains, as she celebrates the neighborhood's rich history and vibrant lives. While many cities suffer from the leveling effects of globalization, the rue des Martyrs maintains its distinct allure. On this street, the patron saint of France was beheaded and the Jesuits took their first vows. It was here that Edgar Degas and Pierre-Auguste Renoir painted circus acrobats, Émile Zola situated a lesbian dinner club in his novel Nana, and François Truffaut filmed scenes from The 400 Blows. Sciolino reveals the charms and idiosyncrasies of this street and its longtime residents--the Tunisian greengrocer, the husband-and-wife cheesemongers, the showman who's been running a transvestite cabaret for more than half a century, the owner of a hundred-year-old bookstore, the woman who repairs eighteenth-century mercury barometers--bringing Paris alive in all of its unique majesty. The Only Street in Paris will make readers hungry for Paris, for cheese and wine, and for the kind of street life that is all too quickly disappearing"--Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 283-294).

The perfect street -- Searching for home -- Is fish necessary? -- Hidden in plain sight -- Wedding the crowd -- Now, this is butter! -- To catch a mouse -- The meaning of martyrdom -- Some of my favorite ghosts -- The knife sharpener -- Guess who's coming to passover? -- The murdered schoolgirls -- Cheaper than a psychiatrist -- In celebration of books -- The artisan with the golden touch -- Minister of the night -- The dive -- The Flying House of the Virgin Mary -- A street fit for a pope -- Le kale Américain est arrivé! -- The resurrection of fish -- Le potluck.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Rue des Martyrs is more than just a street, it's an enchanting and bustling community in Paris. At just over half a mile long, spanning between the Ninth and 18th arrondissements, this street is filled with four- and five-story buildings of varying architectural designs, with picturesque wrought-iron balconies and shuttered windows and small businesses at street level. As the author (La Seduction), a former Paris bureau chief for the New York Times, explores her neighborhood, she describes its fascinating history, from ancient churches and the saints and martyrs the street may be named after to the 19th-century Cirque Medrano. The quaint cafés and shops remain locally owned, per Paris law, and their merchants and artisans are the leading characters of the book-and of the street. There's Roger Henri, who pushes a cart with a bell offering his knife-sharpening services; Michou, the owner and creator of the transvestite cabaret at No. 80; and Laurence Gillery, the woman who restores antique barometers, the last of her kind. The atmosphere on rue des Martyrs is refreshing and enticing in our modern world. VERDICT A must for readers who are interested in travel, Paris, or the expatriate life. [See Prepub Alert, 5/11/15.]-Melissa Keegan, Ela Area P.L., Lake Zurich, IL © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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