The book of memory /

by Gappah, Petina [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016.Edition: First American edition.Description: 276 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780865479074; 0865479070.Subject(s): Women prisoners -- Fiction | Albinos and albinism -- Zimbabwe -- Harare -- Fiction | Zimbabwean fiction | Harare (Zimbabwe) -- Fiction | NovelsSummary: Memory, the narrator of Petina Gappah's The Book of Memory, is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, after being sentenced for murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. The death penalty is a mandatory sentence for murder, and Memory is, both literally and metaphorically, writing for her life. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?
Awards: Click to open in new window
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Fiction FIC GAP Long Overdue (Lost) 39270004491530

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> The story that you have asked me to tell you does not begin with the pitiful ugliness of Lloyd's death. It begins on a long-ago day in August when the sun seared my blistered face and I was nine years old and my father and mother sold me to a strange man. </p> <p>Memory, the narrator of Petina Gappah's The Book of Memory , is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, after being sentenced for murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. The death penalty is a mandatory sentence for murder, and Memory is, both literally and metaphorically, writing for her life. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was LloydHendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?</p> <p>Moving between the townships of the poor and the suburbs of the rich, and between past and present, the 2009 Guardian First Book Award-winning writer Petina Gappah weaves a compelling tale of love, obsession, the relentlessness of fate, and the treachery of memory.</p>

Memory, the narrator of Petina Gappah's The Book of Memory, is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, after being sentenced for murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. The death penalty is a mandatory sentence for murder, and Memory is, both literally and metaphorically, writing for her life. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In her first novel, which follows the successful story collection An Elegy for Easterly, Gappah returns to her native Zimbabwe. Memory, the smart and often surprisingly witty narrator, begins by describing the abominable conditions of Chikurubi Prison, where she waits on death row. She has been found guilty of murdering Lloyd Hendricks, a white man and her adopted father. Gappah moves readers back and forth in time to reveals the factors resulting in Memory's arrest and conviction. With the slow unraveling of events, the book is structured like a whodunit, but at its heart is the relationship of memory to truth. Memory's recollections are often disputable, calling into question her reliability as a storyteller and forcing readers to wonder about their own remembrance of things past. The narrator's outsider status as an albino, an adopted child, a woman, and a convict further complicates her perspective. But the novel is also strengthened by its investigation of forgiveness, and the author offers fresh insight into Zimbabwe's struggle for independence and Robert Mugabe's rise to power. VERDICT At times, it's not clear whether gaps in the story are owing to Memory's problematic recollections or to occasionally inconsistent narrative development. Overall, however, Gappah delivers her themes successfully, while stimulating all the senses with Memory's vivid descriptions of food, music, heat, colors, and scents. [See Prepub Alert, 8/3/15.]-Faye Chadwell, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Novelist Select