The penultimate peril /

by Snicket, Lemony; Helquist, Brett [ill.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Snicket, Lemony. Series of unfortunate events: bk. 12.Publisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, c2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: 353, [1] p. : ill. ; 19 cm.ISBN: 0064410153 (trade bdg.) :; 0060296437 (lib. bdg.).Title notes: $11.99 (3 copies) 12-2005 (db)$15.89 4/19/2007.$11.99 (g) 6/18/2007.Subject(s): Baudelaire, Violet (Fictitious character) -- Juvenile fiction | Baudelaire, Klaus (Fictitious character) -- Juvenile fiction | Baudelaire, Sunny (Fictitious character) -- Juvenile fiction | Orphans -- Juvenile fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Hotels -- Juvenile fiction | Disguise in literature -- Juvenile fiction | Flaneurs -- Juvenile fiction | Illustrators -- Utah -- Juvenile fiction | Baudelaire, Violet (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Baudelaire, Klaus (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Baudelaire, Sunny (Fictitious character) -- Fiction | Orphans -- Fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Fiction | Hotels, motels, etc. -- Fiction | Humorous stories | Chapter books | Humorous stories, American -- Juvenile fiction | Humorous fictionSummary: The Baudelaire orphans disguise themselves as employees of the Hotel Denoument and find themselves pursued by the evil Count Olaf and others. Lemony Snicket returns with the last book before the last book of his New York Times bestselling Series of Unfortunate Events.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's Fiction J SNI v. 12 Available 39270004479774

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIES</p> <p>Lemony Snicket returns with the last book before the last book of his bestselling A Series of Unfortunate Events. Scream and run away before the secrets of the series are revealed!</p> <p>Very little is known about Lemony Snicket and A Series of Unfortunate Events. What we do know is contained in the following brief list:</p> The books have inexplicably sold millions and millions of copies worldwide People in more than 40 countries are consumed by consuming Snicket The movie was as sad as the books, if not more so Like unrefrigerated butter and fungus, the popularity of these books keeps spreading <p>Even less is known about book the twelfth in this alarming phenomenon. What we do know is contained in the following brief list:</p> In this book, things only get worse Count Olaf is still evil The Baudelaire orphans do not win a contest The title begins with the word 'The' <p>Sometimes, ignorance is bliss.</p>

The Baudelaire orphans disguise themselves as employees of the Hotel Denoument and find themselves pursued by the evil Count Olaf and others. Lemony Snicket returns with the last book before the last book of his New York Times bestselling Series of Unfortunate Events.

$11.99 (3 copies) 12-2005 (db)

$15.89 4/19/2007.

$11.99 (g) 6/18/2007.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">A Series of Unfortunate Events #12: The Penultimate Peril Chapter One Certain people have said that the world is like a calm pond, and that anytime a person does even the smallest thing, it is as if a stone has dropped into the pond, spreading circles of ripples further and further out, until the entire world has been changed by one tiny action. If this is true, then the book you are reading now is the perfect thing to drop into a pond. The ripples will spread across the surface of the pond and the world will change for the better, with one less dreadful story for people to read and one more secret hidden at the bottom of a pond, where most people never think of looking. The miserable tale of the Baudelaire orphans will be safe in the pond's murky depths, and you will be happier not to read the grim story I have written, but instead to gaze at the rippling scum that rises to the top of the world. The Baudelaires themselves, as they rode in the back of a taxi driven by a woman they scarcely knew, might have been happy to jump into a pond themselves, had they known what sort of story lay ahead of them as the automobile made its way among the twisting streets of the city where the orphans had once lived. Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire gazed out of the windows of the car, marveling at how little the city had changed since a fire destroyed their home, took the lives of their parents, and created ripples in the Baudelaires' lives that would probably never become calm. As the taxi turned a corner, Violet saw the market where she and her siblings had shopped for ingredients to make dinner for Count Olaf, the notorious villain who had become their guardian after the fire. Even after all this time, with Olaf trying scheme after scheme to get his hands on the enormous fortune the Baudelaire parents had left behind, the market looked the same as the day Justice Strauss, a kindly neighbor and a judge in the High Court, had first taken them there. Towering over the market was an enormous, shiny building that Klaus recognized as 667 Dark Avenue, where the Baudelaires had spent some time under the care of Jerome and Esmé Squalor in an enormous penthouse apartment. It seemed to the middle Baudelaire that the building had not changed one bit since the siblings had first discovered Esmé's treacherous and romantic attachment to Count Olaf. And Sunny Baudelaire, who was still small enough that her view out the window was somewhat restricted, heard the rattle of a manhole cover as the taxi drove over it, and remembered the underground passageway she and her siblings had discovered, which led from the basement of 667 Dark Avenue to the ashen remains of their own home. Like the market and the penthouse, the mystery of this passageway had not changed, even though the Baudelaires had discovered a secret organization known as V.F.D. that the children believed had constructed many such passageways. Each mystery the Baudelaires discovered only revealed another mystery, and another, and another, and several more, and another, as if the three siblings were diving deeper and deeper into a pond, and all the while the city lay calm on the surface, unaware of all the unfortunate events in the orphans' lives. Even now, returning to the city that was once their home, the Baudelaire orphans had solved few of the mysteries overshadowing them. They didn't know where they were headed, for instance, and they scarcely knew anything about the woman driving the automobile except her name. "You must have thousands of questions, Baudelaires," said Kit Snicket, spinning the steering wheel with her white-gloved hands. Violet, who had adroit technical faculties -- a phrase which here means "a knack for inventing mechanical devices" -- admired the automobile's purring machinery as the taxi made a sharp turn through a large metal gate and proceeded down a curvy, narrow street lined with shrubbery. "I wish we had more time to talk, but it's already Tuesday. As it is you scarcely have time to eat your important brunch before getting into your concierge disguises and beginning your observations as flaneurs." "Concierge?" Violet asked. "Flaneurs?" Klaus asked. "Brunch?" Sunny asked. Kit smiled, and maneuvered the taxi through another sharp turn. Two books of poetry skittered off the passenger seat to the floor of the automobile -- The Walrus and the Carpenter, and Other Poems by Lewis Carroll, and The Waste Land by T. S. Eliot. The Baudelaires had recently received a message in code, and had used the poetry of Mr. Carroll and Mr. Eliot in order to decode the message and meet Kit Snicket on Briny Beach, and now it seemed that perhaps Kit was still talking in riddles. "A great man once said that right, temporarily defeated, is stronger than evil triumphant. Do you understand what that means?" Violet and Sunny turned to their brother, who was the literary expert in the family. Klaus Baudelaire had read so many books he was practically a walking library, and had recently taken to writing important and interesting facts in a dark blue commonplace book. "I think so," the middle Baudelaire said. "He thinks that good people are more powerful than evil people, even if evil people appear to be winning. Is he a member of V.F.D.?" "You might say that," Kit said. "Certainly his message applies to our current situation. As you know, our organization split apart some time ago, with much bitterness on both sides." "The schism," Violet said. "Yes," Kit agreed with a sigh. "The schism. V.F.D. was once a united group of volunteers, trying to extinguish fires -- both literally and figuratively. But now there are two groups of bitter enemies. Some of us continue to extinguish fires, but others have turned to much less noble schemes... A Series of Unfortunate Events #12: The Penultimate Peril . Copyright © by Lemony Snicket. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from The Penultimate Peril by Lemony Snicket All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

The perennially unlucky Baudelaire orphans go undercover as concierges in a hotel where copious villains and noble people (often indistinguishable from each other) are gathering. The zanily careening plot and faux-tragic narrative voice can be tiresome, but the surprise ending provides enough suspense to carry readers into the upcoming closing volume. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

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