The impressionists at Argenteuil /

by Tucker, Paul Hayes; National Gallery of Art (U.S.); Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington [D.C.] : Hartford [Conn.] : National Gallery of Art ; Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, c2000Description: 179 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm.ISBN: 0894682490 (pbk.) :; 9780894682490 (pbk.); 0300083491 (cloth); 9780300083491 (cloth).Title notes: $25.00 (g) 11-2014 (db)Subject(s): Impressionism (Art) -- France -- Argenteuil -- Exhibitions | Artist colonies -- France -- Argenteuil -- Exhibitions | Impressionist artists -- France -- Argenteuil -- Exhibitions | Argenteuil (France) -- Social life and customs -- 19th century | Caillebotte, Gustave, 1848-1894 | Manet, Édouard, 1832-1883 | Monet, Claude, 1840-1926 | Renoir, Auguste, 1841-1919 | Sisley, Alfred, 1839-1899 | Impressionnisme (Art) -- France -- Argenteuil -- Expositions | Colonies d'artistes -- France -- Argenteuil -- Expositions | Impressionnistes -- France -- Argenteuil -- Expositions | Argenteuil (France) -- Mœurs et coutumes -- 19e siècle | Schilderijen | Impressionisme | Argenteuil (Val-d'Oise) -- Dans l'art -- Catalogues d'exposition | France -- Argenteuil | 1800 - 1899 | Exhibition catalogsOnline resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description
Contents:
On Place and Meaning: Argenteuil and the Impressionists, 1871-1894 -- Catalogue of the Exhibition -- Index of Paintings in the Exhibition.
Review: "With the exception of Paris, no other site is more closely associated with the birth of impressionism than Argenteuil. Only fifteen minutes by railroad from the heart of the capital, Argenteuil was home to Claude Monet from late 1871 to early 1878, a period that was prolific and revolutionary. It was during his time in Argenteuil that Monet developed his unique vision of landscape painting, at once authentic and idyllic, suffused with light, atmosphere, and the complexities of contemporaneity. At the end of the nineteenth century, other avant-garde painters - Eugene Boudin, Gustave Caillebotte, Edouard Manet, Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley - were also drawn to Argenteuil by its beauty, its proximity to Paris, and its association with suburban recreation. Monet's amiable presence was another source of appeal, and many artists - most notably Sisley and Renoir - came to paint alongside him. The Impressionists at Argenteuil explores the fertile moment when the fascination with atmospheric effects, depictions of modern life, and lively artistic exchanges of the 1860's coalesced to become classic impressionism. An introductory essay as well as entries on fifty-two paintings by Boudin, Caillebotte, Manet, Monet, Renoir, and Sisley present the richness of the artists' individual responses to this site and the relationships that developed among them."--Jacket.
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Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 759.4 TUC Available 39270003796467

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In the 1870s, Argenteuil, located on the outskirts of Paris, was still unmarred by urban industrialization. This book explores the responses to Argenteuil of six influential painters in more than 50 of their works. Catalogue for an upcoming exhibition at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. 105 illustrations, 70 in color.

$25.00 (g) 11-2014 (db)

Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, May 28-Aug. 20, 2000 and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Sept. 6-Dec. 3, 2000.

Includes index.

"With the exception of Paris, no other site is more closely associated with the birth of impressionism than Argenteuil. Only fifteen minutes by railroad from the heart of the capital, Argenteuil was home to Claude Monet from late 1871 to early 1878, a period that was prolific and revolutionary. It was during his time in Argenteuil that Monet developed his unique vision of landscape painting, at once authentic and idyllic, suffused with light, atmosphere, and the complexities of contemporaneity. At the end of the nineteenth century, other avant-garde painters - Eugene Boudin, Gustave Caillebotte, Edouard Manet, Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley - were also drawn to Argenteuil by its beauty, its proximity to Paris, and its association with suburban recreation. Monet's amiable presence was another source of appeal, and many artists - most notably Sisley and Renoir - came to paint alongside him. The Impressionists at Argenteuil explores the fertile moment when the fascination with atmospheric effects, depictions of modern life, and lively artistic exchanges of the 1860's coalesced to become classic impressionism. An introductory essay as well as entries on fifty-two paintings by Boudin, Caillebotte, Manet, Monet, Renoir, and Sisley present the richness of the artists' individual responses to this site and the relationships that developed among them."--Jacket.

On Place and Meaning: Argenteuil and the Impressionists, 1871-1894 -- Catalogue of the Exhibition -- Index of Paintings in the Exhibition.

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