Rebel yell : the violence, passion, and redemption of Stonewall Jackson /

by Gwynne, S. C. (Samuel C.).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Scribner, [2014]Edition: First Scribner hardcover edition.Description: xi, 672 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781451673289 (hardcover) :; 1451673280 (hardcover); 9781451673296 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1451673299 (pbk. : alk. paper).Title notes: $35.00 10-2014 (db)Subject(s): Jackson, Stonewall, 1824-1863 | Generals -- Confederate States of America -- Biography | Jackson, Stonewall, 1824-1863 -- Military leadership | Virginia -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Campaigns | Confederate States of America. Army -- Biography | Jackson, Stonewall, 1824-1863 | Confederate States of America. Army | American Civil War (1861-1865) | United States | United States -- Confederate States of America | Virginia | 1861 - 1865 | Biography | History
Contents:
Legends of spring -- The unimagined war. Away to Richmond ; The imperfect logic of war ; Fate intervenes ; Discipline and other novel ideas ; A brilliant retreat ; Maneuvers, large and small ; All green alike ; The bullet's song ; Scream of furies -- The man within. Glory and darkness ; A very small, very bitter fight ; A highly unusual man ; The embattled professor ; Deliberately and ingeniously cloaked ; An upright citizen -- Valley of the Shadow of Death. Where is the thunder of war? ; A preternatural calm ; A season of storms ; A looming peril ; The realm of the possible ; A jagged line of blood ; The shooting war ; A fool's paradise ; Hazards of command ; Hunter as prey ; The professor's time/speed/distance equation ; A lethal footrace ; The taking of Winchester ; Lincoln's perfect trap ; A strange fondness for traps ; Slaughter in a small place -- Stirrings of a legend. Acclaim, and a new mission ; The hilljack and the society boy ; The defense of Richmond ; Victory by any other name ; In which everything changes ; No backing out this day ; The hum of a beehive ; At bay on his baptismal soil ; The mongrel, barefooted crew ; The blood-washed ground ; Stonewall Jackson's way -- All that is ever given to a man. Winter of dreams ; Cometh the hour, cometh the man ; "An iron sabre vowed to an iron lord" ; Immortality -- Appendix. Other lives, other destinies.
Summary: Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon, even Robert E. Lee, he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country's greatest military figures. His brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. Jackson's strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged. He was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future. In April 1862, Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. He had, moreover, given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked -- hope -- and struck fear into the hearts of the Union. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson's private life, including the loss of his young beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. It traces Jackson's brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.
Awards: Click to open in new window
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Biography BIO JAC S. Available 39270003813791

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the author of the prizewinning New York Times bestseller Empire of the Summer Moon comes a thrilling account of how Civil War general Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson became a great and tragic American hero.<br> <br> Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon, even Robert E. Lee, he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country's greatest military figures. His brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. Jackson's strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.<br> <br> In April 1862 Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. He had, moreover, given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked-hope-and struck fear into the hearts of the Union.<br> <br> Rebel Yell is written with the swiftly vivid narrative that is Gwynne's hallmark and is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict between historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson's private life, including the loss of his young beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. It traces Jackson's brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.

$35.00 10-2014 (db)

Includes bibliographical references (pages 623-634) and index.

Legends of spring -- The unimagined war. Away to Richmond ; The imperfect logic of war ; Fate intervenes ; Discipline and other novel ideas ; A brilliant retreat ; Maneuvers, large and small ; All green alike ; The bullet's song ; Scream of furies -- The man within. Glory and darkness ; A very small, very bitter fight ; A highly unusual man ; The embattled professor ; Deliberately and ingeniously cloaked ; An upright citizen -- Valley of the Shadow of Death. Where is the thunder of war? ; A preternatural calm ; A season of storms ; A looming peril ; The realm of the possible ; A jagged line of blood ; The shooting war ; A fool's paradise ; Hazards of command ; Hunter as prey ; The professor's time/speed/distance equation ; A lethal footrace ; The taking of Winchester ; Lincoln's perfect trap ; A strange fondness for traps ; Slaughter in a small place -- Stirrings of a legend. Acclaim, and a new mission ; The hilljack and the society boy ; The defense of Richmond ; Victory by any other name ; In which everything changes ; No backing out this day ; The hum of a beehive ; At bay on his baptismal soil ; The mongrel, barefooted crew ; The blood-washed ground ; Stonewall Jackson's way -- All that is ever given to a man. Winter of dreams ; Cometh the hour, cometh the man ; "An iron sabre vowed to an iron lord" ; Immortality -- Appendix. Other lives, other destinies.

Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon, even Robert E. Lee, he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country's greatest military figures. His brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. Jackson's strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged. He was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future. In April 1862, Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. He had, moreover, given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked -- hope -- and struck fear into the hearts of the Union. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson's private life, including the loss of his young beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. It traces Jackson's brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Map of Jackson's Theater of Operations: April 21, 1861-May 10, 1863 (p. xii)
  • Prologue: Legends of Spring (p. 1)
  • Part 1 The Unimagined War
  • 1 Away to Richmond (p. 13)
  • 2 The Imperfect Logic of War (p. 20)
  • 3 Fate Intervenes (p. 32)
  • 4 Discipline and Other Novel Ideas (p. 37)
  • 5 A Brilliant Retreat (p. 47)
  • 6 Maneuvers, Large and Small (p. 52)
  • 7 All Green Alike (p. 65)
  • Map of First Manassas: July 21, 1862 (p. 70)
  • 8 The Bullet's Song (p. 73)
  • 9 Scream of the Furies (p. 84)
  • Part 2 The Man Within the Man
  • 10 Glory and Darkness (p. 97)
  • 11 A Very Small, Very Bitter Fight (p. 110)
  • 12 A Highly Unusual Man (p. 119)
  • 13 The Embattled Professor (p. 127)
  • 14 Deliberately and Ingeniously Cloaked (p. 135)
  • 15 An Upright Citizen (p. 151)
  • Part 3 Valley of the Shadow of Death
  • 16 Where Is the Thunder of War? (p. 161)
  • 17 A Preternatural Calm (p. 170)
  • 18 A Season of Storms (p. 176)
  • 19 A Looming Peril (p. 193)
  • 20 The Realm of the Possible (p. 204)
  • Maps of Jackson's Valley Campaign (p. 208)
  • 21 A Jagged Line of Blood (p. 212)
  • Map of the Battle of Kernstown: March 23, 1862 (p. 214)
  • 22 The Shooting War (p. 229)
  • 23 A Fool's Paradise (p. 234)
  • 24 Hazards of Command (p. 257)
  • 25 Hunter as Prey (p. 266)
  • 26 The Professor's Time/Speed/Distance Equation (p. 274)
  • Map of the Battles of Front Royal and Winchester: May 23-25, 1862 (p. 276)
  • 27 A Lethal Footrace (p. 282)
  • 28 The Taking of Winchester (p. 291)
  • 29 Lincoln's Perfect Trap (p. 299)
  • 30 A Strange Fondness for Traps (p. 312)
  • Map of Port Republic: June 9, 1862 (p. 314)
  • 31 Slaughter in a Small Place (p. 322)
  • Part 4 Stirrings of a Legend
  • 32 Acclaim, and a New Mission (p. 331)
  • 33 'The Hilljack and the Society Boy (p. 340)
  • 34 The Defense of Richmond (p. 348)
  • Map of the Seven Days Campaign: June 25-July 1, 1862 (p. 350)
  • 35 Victor)-by Any Other Name (p. 363)
  • 36 In Which Everything Changes (p. 383)
  • 37 No Backing Out This Day (p. 394)
  • 38 The Hum of a Beehive (p. 408)
  • Map of Second Manassas: Jackson's Flank March: August 24-27, 1862 (p. 412)
  • 39 At Bay on His Baptismal Soil (p. 423)
  • Map of Second Manassas: August 28, 1862 (p. 425)
  • Map of Second Manassas: August 29-30, 1862 (p. 426)
  • 40 The Mongrel, Barefooted Crew (p. 447)
  • 41 The Blood-Washed Ground (p. 461)
  • Map of Antietam: September 17, 1862 (p. 463)
  • 42 Stonewall Jackson's Way (p. 482)
  • Map of Fredericksburg: December 11-15, 1862 (p. 495)
  • Part 5 All That Is Ever Given to a Man
  • 43 Winter of Dreams (p. 507)
  • 44 Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man (p. 519)
  • Map of Chancellorsville: May 1-3, 1863 (p. 524)
  • 45 "An Iron Sabre Vowed to an Iron Lord" (p. 539)
  • 46 Immortality (p. 552)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 563)
  • Appendix: Other Lives, Other Destinies (p. 565)
  • Notes (p. 577)
  • Bibliography (p. 623)
  • Insert Photograph Credits (p. 635)
  • Index (p. 637)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this well-crafted biography, Gwynne (Empire of the Summer Moon) enters the crowded field of Civil War history, canvassing Stonewall Jackson's life from an eccentric physics professor at the Virginia Military Institute to his ascension into Southern lore and legend. Gwynne's work stands out from the rest by taking one of the conflict's more well-known figures and edifying, through lucid prose and solid research, the man behind the myth. The author capably travels beyond the battlefield and into the general's early life and relationships, subjects most other biographers leave unexplored. Cotter Smith's narration, while a bit slow, is pitch-perfect for the content. -VERDICT A relatively quick listen for such a long work, this audio is highly recommended to fans of Gwynne's previous work, books by James McPherson, and Michael Korda's Clouds of Glory. ["This popular history is recommended for all readers interested in the Civil War. Academic librarians should also strongly consider," read the review of the Scribner hc, LJ 8/14.]-Brian Odom, Huntsville, AL © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Novelist Select