The family Romanov : murder, rebellion & the fall of Imperial Russia /

by Fleming, Candace [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Schwartz & Wade Books, [2014]Edition: First edition.Description: 292 pages, 32 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, genealogical tables ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780375867828 :; 0375867821; 9780375967825 (glb); 0375967826 (glb).Title notes: $18.99 9-2014 (db)BRA $21.99 10/21/2014Subject(s): Russia -- History -- Nicholas II, 1894-1917 | Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, 1868-1918 -- Family | Romanov, House of | Soviet Union -- History -- Revolution, 1917-1921 | Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, 1868-1918 | Romanov, House of | Russia | Soviet Union | 1894 - 1921
Contents:
Before you begin -- Russia 1903 -- Beyond the palace gates: peasant turned worker -- Before the storm -- "I dreamed that I was loved" -- Beyond the palace gates: a peasant boyhood -- "What a disappointment!" -- Beyond the palace gates: lullabies for peasant babies -- "A small family circle" -- Beyond the palace gates: another family circle -- Dark clouds gathering -- The year of nightmares -- Lenin, the duma, and a mystic named Rasputin -- Beyond the palace gates: house no. 13 -- "Pig and filth" and family fun -- Beyond the palace gates: an occupation for workers' daughters -- Gathering clouds -- Three centuries of Romanovs -- Beyond the palace gates: a different kind of education for a different kind of boy -- The storm breaks -- "My God! My God! What madness!" -- In defense of mother Russia -- Beyond the palace gates: Vasily's diary -- The reign of Rasputin -- It all comes tumbling down -- Beyond the palace gates: molecule in a storm -- "Ye tyrants quake, your day is over" -- Beyond the palace gates: ye tyrants quake, your day is over -- Final days -- "Survivors of a shipwreck" -- Beyond the palace gates: the tsar's surprise party -- Into Siberia -- Beyond the palace gates: swarming the palace -- The house of special purpose -- Deadly intent -- "The world will never know what has become of them" -- Beyond the palace gates: living in communist Russia.
Summary: From the acclaimed author of Amelia Lost and The Lincolns comes a heartrending narrative nonfiction page-turner--and a perfect resource for meeting Common Core standards. When Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II, inherited the throne in 1894, he was unprepared to do so. With their four daughters (including Anastasia) and only son, a hemophiliac, Nicholas and his reclusive wife, Alexandra, buried their heads in the sand, living a life of opulence as World War I raged outside their door and political unrest grew into the Russian Revolution. Deftly maneuvering between the lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's peasants and urban workers--and their eventual uprising--Fleming offers up a fascinating portrait, complete with inserts featuring period photographs and compelling primary-source material that brings it all to life.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Young Adult Collection Young Adult NonFiction YA 947.083 FLE Available 39270003804493

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Here is the riveting story of the Russian Revolution as it unfolded. When Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II, inherited the throne in 1894, he was unprepared to do so. With their four daughters (including Anastasia) and only son, a hemophiliac, Nicholas and his reclusive wife, Alexandra, buried their heads in the sand, living a life of opulence as World War I raged outside their door and political unrest grew.<br> <br> Deftly maneuvering between the lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's peasants-and their eventual uprising-Fleming offers up a fascinating portrait, complete with inserts featuring period photographs and compelling primary-source material that brings it all to life. History doesn't get more interesting than the story of the Romanovs.

$18.99 9-2014 (db)

BRA $21.99 10/21/2014

Includes bibliographical references (pages [256]-265) and index.

Before you begin -- Russia 1903 -- Beyond the palace gates: peasant turned worker -- Before the storm -- "I dreamed that I was loved" -- Beyond the palace gates: a peasant boyhood -- "What a disappointment!" -- Beyond the palace gates: lullabies for peasant babies -- "A small family circle" -- Beyond the palace gates: another family circle -- Dark clouds gathering -- The year of nightmares -- Lenin, the duma, and a mystic named Rasputin -- Beyond the palace gates: house no. 13 -- "Pig and filth" and family fun -- Beyond the palace gates: an occupation for workers' daughters -- Gathering clouds -- Three centuries of Romanovs -- Beyond the palace gates: a different kind of education for a different kind of boy -- The storm breaks -- "My God! My God! What madness!" -- In defense of mother Russia -- Beyond the palace gates: Vasily's diary -- The reign of Rasputin -- It all comes tumbling down -- Beyond the palace gates: molecule in a storm -- "Ye tyrants quake, your day is over" -- Beyond the palace gates: ye tyrants quake, your day is over -- Final days -- "Survivors of a shipwreck" -- Beyond the palace gates: the tsar's surprise party -- Into Siberia -- Beyond the palace gates: swarming the palace -- The house of special purpose -- Deadly intent -- "The world will never know what has become of them" -- Beyond the palace gates: living in communist Russia.

From the acclaimed author of Amelia Lost and The Lincolns comes a heartrending narrative nonfiction page-turner--and a perfect resource for meeting Common Core standards. When Russia's last tsar, Nicholas II, inherited the throne in 1894, he was unprepared to do so. With their four daughters (including Anastasia) and only son, a hemophiliac, Nicholas and his reclusive wife, Alexandra, buried their heads in the sand, living a life of opulence as World War I raged outside their door and political unrest grew into the Russian Revolution. Deftly maneuvering between the lives of the Romanovs and the plight of Russia's peasants and urban workers--and their eventual uprising--Fleming offers up a fascinating portrait, complete with inserts featuring period photographs and compelling primary-source material that brings it all to life.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Before You Begin (p. vii)
  • Russia, 1903 (p. 1)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Peasant Turned Worker (p. 11)
  • Part 1 Before the Storm
  • Chapter 1 "I Dreamed That I Was Loved" (p. 17)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: A Peasant Boyhood (p. 23)
  • Chapter 2 "What a Disappointment!" (p. 35)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Lullabies for Peasant Babies (p. 40)
  • Chapter 3 "A Small Family Circle" (p. 45)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Another Family Circle (p. 48)
  • Part 2 Dark Clouds Gathering
  • Chapter 4 The Year of Nightmares (p. 59)
  • Chapter 5 Lenin, the Duma, and a Mystic Named Rasputin (p. 68)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: House No. 13 (p. 71)
  • Chapter 6 "Pig and Filth" and Family Fun (p. 88)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: An Occupation for Workers' Daughters (p. 96)
  • Chapter 7 Gathering Clouds (p. 100)
  • Chapter 8 Three Centuries of Romanovs (p. 113)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: A Different Kind of Education for a Different Kind of Boy (p. 120)
  • Part 3 The Storm Breaks
  • Chapter 9 "My God! My God! What Madness!" (p. 125)
  • Chapter 10 In Defense of Mother Russia (p. 133)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Vasily's Diary (p. 135)
  • Chapter 11 "The Reign of Rasputin" (p. 146)
  • Chapter 12 It All Comes Tumbling Down (p. 156)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Molecule in a Storm (p. 168)
  • Chapter 13 "Ye Tyrants Quake, Your Day Is Over" (p. 170)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: "Ye Tyrants Quake, Your Day Is Over" (p. 177)
  • Part 4 Final Days
  • Chapter 14 "Survivors of a Shipwreck" (p. 181)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: The "Tsar's Surprise Party" (p. 192)
  • Chapter 15 Into Siberia (p. 196)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Swarming the Palace (p. 202)
  • Chapter 16 The House of Special Purpose (p. 215)
  • Chapter 17 Deadly Intent (p. 227)
  • Chapter 18 "The World Will Never Know What Has Become of Them" (p. 241)
  • Beyond the Palace Gates: Life Under Lenin (p. 247)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 255)
  • Bibliography (p. 256)
  • The Romanovs Online (p. 266)
  • Notes (p. 267)
  • Index (p. 288)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">1881-1895 The Boy Who Would Be Tsar On a frosty March day in 1881, the boy who would become Russia's last ruler glimpsed his future. That morning, Nicholas's grandfather, Tsar Alexander II, was riding through the streets of St. Petersburg when a man stepped off the sidewalk. He hurled a bomb at the imperial carriage. Miraculously, the tsar went uninjured, but many in his retinue were not as lucky. Concerned about his people, Alexander stepped from his carriage. That's when a second bomb was thrown. This one landed between his feet. An explosion of fire and shrapnel tore away Alexander's left leg, ripped open his abdomen, and mangled his face. Barely conscious, he managed one last command: "To the palace, to die there." Horrified members of the imperial family rushed to his side. Thirteen-year-old Nicholas, dressed in a blue sailor suit, followed a thick trail of dark blood up the white marble stairs to his grandfather's study. There he found Alexander lying on a couch, one eye closed, the other staring blankly at the ceiling. Nicholas's father, also named Alexander, was already in the room. "My father took me up to the bed," Nicholas later recalled. " 'Papa,' [my father] said, raising his voice, 'your ray of sunshine is here.' I saw the eyelashes tremble. . . . [Grandfather] moved a finger. He could not raise his hands, nor say what he wanted to, but he undoubtedly recognized me." Deathly pale, Nicholas stood helplessly at the end of the bed as his beloved grandfather took his last breath. "The emperor is dead," announced the court physician. Nicholas's father--now the new tsar--clenched his fists. The Russian people would pay for this. Alexander II had been a reformer, the most liberal tsar in centuries. He'd freed the serfs (peasant slaves) and modernized the courts. But his murder convinced his son, Alexander III, that the people had been treated too softly. If order was to be maintained, they needed to "feel the whip." And for the next thirteen years of his reign, Alexander III made sure they did. Young Nicholas, standing beside his grandfather's deathbed, knew nothing of politics. Frightened, he covered his face with his hands and sobbed bitterly. He was left, he later confessed, with a "presentiment--a secret conviction . . . that I am destined for terrible trials." Excerpted from The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

Marrying the intimate family portrait of Heiligman's Charles and Emma (rev. 1/09) with the politics and intrigue of Sheinkin's Bomb (rev. 11/12), Fleming has outdone herself with this riveting work of narrative nonfiction that appeals to the imagination as much as the intellect. Her focus here is not just the Romanovs, the last imperial family of Russia, but the Revolutionary leaders and common people as well. She cogently and sympathetically demonstrates how each group was the product of its circumstances, then how they all moved inexorably toward the tragic yet fascinating conclusion. Each member of the Romanov family emerges from these pages as a fully realized individual, but their portraits are balanced with vignettes that illuminate the lives of ordinary people, giving the book a bracing context missing from Massie's Nicholas and Alexandra, still the standard popular history. The epic, sweeping narrative seamlessly incorporates scholarly authority, primary sources, appropriate historical speculation, and a keen eye for the most telling details. Moreover, the juxtaposition of the supremely privileged lifestyle of Russian nobility with the meager subsistence of peasants, factory workers, and soldiers creates a narrative tension that builds toward the horrifying climax. Front and back matter include a map, genealogy, bibliography, and source notes, while two sixteen-page inserts contain numerous captioned photographs. jonathan hunt (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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