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Dust of Eden /

by Nagai, Mariko.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago, Illinois : Albert Whitman & Company, 2014Description: 121 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780807517390 :; 0807517399 :.Subject(s): Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Juvenile fiction | Novels in verse | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Fiction | Family life -- Fiction | World War, 1939-1945 -- United States -- FictionSummary: "Thirteen-year-old Mina Tagawa and her Japanese-American family are forced to evacuate their Seattle home and are relocated to an internment camp in Idaho, where they live for three years"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Japanese Internment Awards: Click to open in new window
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's Fiction J NAG (Browse shelf) Available 39270004161018

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"We lived under a sky so blue in Idaho right near the towns of Hunt and Eden but we were not welcomed there." In early 1942, thirteen-year-old Mina Masako Tagawa and her Japanese-American family are sent from their home in Seattle to an internment camp in Idaho. What do you do when your home country treats you like an enemy? This memorable and powerful novel in verse, written by award-winning author Mariko Nagai, explores the nature of fear, the value of acceptance, and the beauty of life. As thought-provoking as it is uplifting, Dust of Eden is told with an honesty that is both heart-wrenching and inspirational.

"Thirteen-year-old Mina Tagawa and her Japanese-American family are forced to evacuate their Seattle home and are relocated to an internment camp in Idaho, where they live for three years"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

In this verse novel, we first meet Mina Tagawa and her Seattle-based family just before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Shortly after, her father is imprisoned, and the rest of the family -- Mina, her mother, grandfather, and older brother Nick -- are sent to the Minidoka Relocation Center in Idaho, where they live in poor conditions for three years. Over the course of that time, Mina's beloved grandfather dies, and Nick enlists and is sent to the European front. Interspersed throughout the main text are letters Mina writes to her father, to her best friend from home, and to Nick; Mina's school assignments; and, most poignantly, honest letters about the war that Nick writes from Europe but can never send. The sheer volume of issues raised in the slim novel (racism, tensions between immigrant generations, the nature of American identity and patriotism, the liberation of Dachau, the Hiroshima bombing) can overwhelm the personal story, leaving readers somewhat disconnected from Mina. However, Nagai's writing is spare and rhythmic -- it's real poetry. sarah ellis (c) Copyright 2014. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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