The app generation : how today's youth navigate identity, intimacy, and imagination in a digital world /

by Gardner, Howard; Davis, Katie (Assistant professor).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, [2013]Description: xii, 244 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780300196214 (hardback) :; 0300196210 (hardback).Title notes: $25.00 3-2014 (db)Subject(s): Internet and youth | Youth -- Social networks | Technology and youth | Identity (Psychology) | Creative ability in adolescence | Application software | Sociale netwerken | Technische ontwikkeling | Jongeren | Software
Contents:
Introduction -- Talk about technology -- Unpacking the generations: from biology to culture to technology -- Personal identity in the age of the app -- Apps and intimate relationships -- Acts (and apps) of imagination among today's youth -- Conclusion: beyond the app generation.
Summary: "No one has failed to notice that the current generation of youth is deeply--some would say totally--involved with digital media. Professors Howard Gardner and Katie Davis name today's young people The App Generation, and in this spellbinding book they explore what it means to be "app-dependent" versus "app-enabled" and how life for this generation differs from life before the digital era. Gardner and Davis are concerned with three vital areas of adolescent life: identity, intimacy, and imagination. Through innovative research, including interviews of young people, focus groups of those who work with them, and a unique comparison of youthful artistic productions before and after the digital revolution, the authors uncover the drawbacks of apps: they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination. On the other hand, the benefits of apps are equally striking: they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. The challenge is to venture beyond the ways that apps are designed to be used, Gardner and Davis conclude, and they suggest how the power of apps can be a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspirations"-- Provided by publisher.
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Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 004.678 GAR Available 39270003762055

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From the famed Harvard psychologist and an expert on the impact of digital media technologies, a riveting exploration of the power of apps to shape our young people--for better or for worse <br> <br> No one has failed to notice that the current generation of youth is deeply--some would say totally--involved with digital media. Professors Howard Gardner and Katie Davis name today's young people The App Generation, and in this spellbinding book they explore what it means to be "app-dependent" versus "app-enabled" and how life for this generation differs from life before the digital era.   Gardner and Davis are concerned with three vital areas of adolescent life: identity, intimacy, and imagination. Through innovative research, including interviews of young people, focus groups of those who work with them, and a unique comparison of youthful artistic productions before and after the digital revolution, the authors uncover the drawbacks of apps: they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination. On the other hand, the benefits of apps are equally striking: they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. The challenge is to venture beyond the ways that apps are designed to be used, Gardner and Davis conclude, and they suggest how the power of apps can be a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspirations.

$25.00 3-2014 (db)

"No one has failed to notice that the current generation of youth is deeply--some would say totally--involved with digital media. Professors Howard Gardner and Katie Davis name today's young people The App Generation, and in this spellbinding book they explore what it means to be "app-dependent" versus "app-enabled" and how life for this generation differs from life before the digital era. Gardner and Davis are concerned with three vital areas of adolescent life: identity, intimacy, and imagination. Through innovative research, including interviews of young people, focus groups of those who work with them, and a unique comparison of youthful artistic productions before and after the digital revolution, the authors uncover the drawbacks of apps: they may foreclose a sense of identity, encourage superficial relations with others, and stunt creative imagination. On the other hand, the benefits of apps are equally striking: they can promote a strong sense of identity, allow deep relationships, and stimulate creativity. The challenge is to venture beyond the ways that apps are designed to be used, Gardner and Davis conclude, and they suggest how the power of apps can be a springboard to greater creativity and higher aspirations"-- Provided by publisher.

Introduction -- Talk about technology -- Unpacking the generations: from biology to culture to technology -- Personal identity in the age of the app -- Apps and intimate relationships -- Acts (and apps) of imagination among today's youth -- Conclusion: beyond the app generation.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • 1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 2 Talk about Technology (p. 15)
  • 3 Unpacking the Generations: From Biology to Culture to Technology (p. 35)
  • 4 Personal Identity in the Age of the App (p. 60)
  • 5 Apps and Intimate Relationships (p. 92)
  • 6 Acts (and Apps) of Imagination among Today's Youth (p. 120)
  • 7 Conclusion: Beyond the App Generation (p. 155)
  • Methodological Appendix (p. 199)
  • Notes (p. 209)
  • Index (p. 231)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

In this short, dense work, coauthors Gardner (Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, Harvard; senior director, Harvard Project Zoo), of "multiple intelligences" fame, and Davis (iSchool, Univ. of Washington) delve into the world of apps and their effect on children and adolescents. Armed with results from focus groups, surveys, and mixed-method studies with teachers, psychologists, and youth from ages ten to 25, their study explores the implications of apps through identity, intimacy, and imagination. The authors see the computer tool as "a gated community." App culture is described as cradle to grave, hence one's life becomes a series of app fingerprints or, alternatively, one big app. Like Sherry Turkle (Alone Together:Why We Expect More from Technology) and Jaron Lanier (You Are Not a Gadget), Gardner and Davis express concern regarding increased isolation, digital dependence, and loss of originality in this "remix culture." One drawback to the investigation concerns the emphasis on middle- and upper-class youth. From discussions with their informants, the authors indicate that similar conclusions can be applied to less advantaged groups, but confirmation of this would entail examining youth from other populations. Verdict This cogent study is essential for all libraries. The authors offer accessible, extensively researched, and thoughtful arguments on the challenges and cautions young people face by incorporating the digital world into their lives. Balance and independence become imperative; positive outcomes can occur if we watch out for the risks and promote the benefits.-Jacqueline Snider, Iowa City (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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