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The lightning dreamer : Cuba's greatest abolitionist /

by Engle, Margarita.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boston ; New York : Harcourt, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013Description: 182 pages ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780547807430 (hardback) :; 0547807430 (hardback).Title notes: $16.99 1-2014 (db)Subject(s): Gómez de Avellaneda y Arteaga, Gertrudis, 1814-1873 -- Juvenile fiction | Novels in verse | Gómez de Avellaneda y Arteaga, Gertrudis, 1814-1873 -- Fiction | Authors -- Fiction | Feminists -- Fiction | Abolitionists -- Fiction | Cuba -- History -- 1810-1899 -- Fiction | Biographical fiction | Novels in verse | Historical fiction
Contents:
Historical background -- pt. 1. Suns and rays, 1827 -- pt. 2. The orphan theater, 1827 -- pt. 3. The marriage market, 1828 -- pt. 4. See me as I am, 1829 -- pt. 5. The hotel of Peace, 1836 -- Historical note -- The writing of Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda.
Summary: In free verse, evokes the voice of Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, a book-loving writer, feminist, and abolitionist who courageously fought injustice in nineteenth-century Cuba. Includes historical notes, excerpts from her writings, biographical information, and source notes.
List(s) this item appears in: Young Adult: Latinx Authors Awards: Click to open in new window
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's Fiction J FIC ENG Available 39270003782061

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

"I find it so easy to forget / that I'm just a girl who is expected / to live / without thoughts."<br> <br> Opposing slavery in Cuba in the nineteenth century was dangerous. The most daring abolitionists were poets who veiled their work in metaphor. Of these, the boldest was Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, nicknamed Tula. In passionate, accessible verses of her own, Engle evokes the voice of this book-loving feminist and abolitionist who bravely resisted an arranged marriage at the age of fourteen, and was ultimately courageous enough to fight against injustice. Historical notes, excerpts, and source notes round out this exceptional tribute.

$16.99 1-2014 (db)

In free verse, evokes the voice of Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, a book-loving writer, feminist, and abolitionist who courageously fought injustice in nineteenth-century Cuba. Includes historical notes, excerpts from her writings, biographical information, and source notes.

Includes bibliographical references (page 181).

Historical background -- pt. 1. Suns and rays, 1827 -- pt. 2. The orphan theater, 1827 -- pt. 3. The marriage market, 1828 -- pt. 4. See me as I am, 1829 -- pt. 5. The hotel of Peace, 1836 -- Historical note -- The writing of Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

"So sorry that I am not / the sort of daughter / my mother can love," laments Tula. At thirteen, she wonders "how many slaves / Mam will buy with the money / she gains by marrying me to / the highest bidder." Mam herself twice thwarted her wealthy father by marrying for love; now, however, she schemes to regain her inheritance through her unwilling daughter. Tula's love is language -- the banned words of the poet Heredia "refusing to accept / the existence of slavery" and her own words, "I don't want to be a man, / just a woman / with a voice." Loosely based on the early life of the Cuban novelist and human rights advocate Gertrudis Gmez de Avellaneda (1814-73), this novel in verse follows Tula for the three years that take her into open rebellion and its first consequences; there's also a glimpse of her living independently, as a poet, seven years later. Tula's desperate need to write and her struggle for self-determination resemble that of Pablo Neruda in Pam Muoz Ryan's splendid The Dreamer (rev. 3/10). Brief, lyrical observations from others -- Mam, a beloved brother, the nuns who nurture Tula's creative gift -- add dimension to Tula's own voice and the nineteenth-century Cuban setting. "Words / can be as human / as people, / alive / with the breath / of compassion," says the eloquent former slave Caridad. In Engle's able hands, they are just that. A historical note sorts fact from fiction and samples Avellaneda's poetry. joanna rudge long (c) Copyright 2013. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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