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Borderless economics : Chinese sea turtles, Indian fridges and the new fruits of global capitalism /

by Guest, Robert.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Edition: 1st ed.Description: 250 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780230113824 :; 0230113826.Title notes: $27.00 1-2012 (db)Subject(s): Diffusion of innovations | Business networks | Globalization -- Economic aspects | Immigrants -- United States | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Economics / Comparative | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Economic Conditions
Contents:
The curse of isolation -- Migrationomics: How moving makes us richer -- Bridges to China: Tales from the world's greatest diaspora -- Diaspora politics: How the sea turtles will turn China democratic -- Networks of innovation: How migrants can cut your medical bills -- Networks of trust: How the brain drain reduces global poverty -- Networks of hate: Genocide, terrorism and crime -- "A Ponzi scheme that works": Why migrants choose America -- The hub of the world: Why America will remain number one -- A mobile world.
Summary: "Today, thanks to the ease of technology and travel, we enjoy unprecendented levels of interconnectedness. Societies are increasingly mobile, and immigrant populations maintain strong ties with their native countries, allowing for an unbroken chain of innovation and knowledge that stretches all the way back home. Robert Guest, Global Business Editor for The Economist, shows how today's tribal networks transcend national borders, and how they are shaping the global community in unforeseen ways, including: *So-called "Chinese sea turtles," young Chinese who come to the West for college before returning to China, eagerly absorb democratic ideals along with their technical training. Now, as they assume leadership positions in Chinese government and business, they will slowly turn China democratic. *Indian diasporas, having long brought western technology to their home countries, are now bringing Indian technology to the West. They've already developed $70 refrigerators and $2,000 cars; their frugal innovations and managerial know-how are about to turn the global economy on its head. In a world where trade, trust, and information flow through ethnic networks, the nation that values open borders and encourages the growth of its diaspora populations will be the superpower of the twenty-first century. With on-the-ground reporting from dozens of countries, this is a timely look at the forces greater than national boundaries, and how they can be harnessed to move the whole planet forward"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Chinese New Year
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Acentury ago, migrants often crossed an ocean and never saw their homelands again. Today, they call - or Skype - home the moment their flight has landed, and that's just the beginning. Thanks to cheap travel and easy communication, immigrants everywhere stay in intimate contact with their native countries, creating powerful cross-border networks.</p> <p>In Borderless Economics , Robert Guest, The Economist 's Business Editor, travels through dozens of countries and 44 American states, observing how these networks create wealth, spread ideas and foster innovation. He shows how:<br> * Brainy Indians in America collaborate with brainy Indians in India to build $70 fridges and $300 houses<br> * Young Chinese study in the West and then return home (where they're known as "sea turtles"), infecting China with ideas that will eventually turn it democratic<br> * The so-called "brain drain" - the flow of educated migrants from poorcountries to rich ones - actually reduces global poverty<br> *America's unique ability to attract and absorb migrants lets it tap into the energy of all the world's diaspora networks. So despite its current woes, if the United States keeps its borders open, it will remain the world's most powerful nation indefinitely.<br> With on-the-ground reporting from Asia, Africa, Europe and even Idaho, this book examines how migration, for the all the disruption it causes, makes the world wealthier and happier.</p>

$27.00 1-2012 (db)

"Today, thanks to the ease of technology and travel, we enjoy unprecendented levels of interconnectedness. Societies are increasingly mobile, and immigrant populations maintain strong ties with their native countries, allowing for an unbroken chain of innovation and knowledge that stretches all the way back home. Robert Guest, Global Business Editor for The Economist, shows how today's tribal networks transcend national borders, and how they are shaping the global community in unforeseen ways, including: *So-called "Chinese sea turtles," young Chinese who come to the West for college before returning to China, eagerly absorb democratic ideals along with their technical training. Now, as they assume leadership positions in Chinese government and business, they will slowly turn China democratic. *Indian diasporas, having long brought western technology to their home countries, are now bringing Indian technology to the West. They've already developed $70 refrigerators and $2,000 cars; their frugal innovations and managerial know-how are about to turn the global economy on its head. In a world where trade, trust, and information flow through ethnic networks, the nation that values open borders and encourages the growth of its diaspora populations will be the superpower of the twenty-first century. With on-the-ground reporting from dozens of countries, this is a timely look at the forces greater than national boundaries, and how they can be harnessed to move the whole planet forward"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The curse of isolation -- Migrationomics: How moving makes us richer -- Bridges to China: Tales from the world's greatest diaspora -- Diaspora politics: How the sea turtles will turn China democratic -- Networks of innovation: How migrants can cut your medical bills -- Networks of trust: How the brain drain reduces global poverty -- Networks of hate: Genocide, terrorism and crime -- "A Ponzi scheme that works": Why migrants choose America -- The hub of the world: Why America will remain number one -- A mobile world.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction The Curse of Isolation (p. 1)
  • Chapter 1 Migrationomics: How Moving Makes Us Richer (p. 11)
  • Chapter 2 Bridges to China: Tales from the World's Greatest Diaspora (p. 35)
  • Chapter 3 Diaspora Politics: How the Sea Turtles Will Turn China Democratic (p. 59)
  • Chapter 4 Networks of Innovation: How Migrants Can Cut Your Medical Bills (p. 87)
  • Chapter 5 Networks of Trust: How the Brain Drain Reduces Global Poverty (p. 109)
  • Chapter 6 Networks of Hate: Genocide, Terrorism and Crime (p. 129)
  • Chapter 7 "A Ponzi Scheme That Works": Why Migrants Choose America (p. 157)
  • Chapter 8 The Hub of the World: Why America Will Remain Number One (p. 181)
  • Conclusion A Mobile World (p. 205)
  • Notes (p. 222)
  • Index (p. 242)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Guest (business editor, Economist) provides an eye-opening examination of current and historic migration as a form of networking among people and one that can have global economic benefits. Such benefits include wealth creation, poverty reduction, knowledge transfer, and innovation. He presents compelling arguments for opening borders, especially if the United States wants to maintain its superpower status; addresses myths, such as job stealing by immigrants and brain drain; and offers insights about why immigrants are often very successful in their newly adopted homelands. Readers will be drawn to this work for Guest's engaging writing and the variety of case studies he presents from his experiences and from countries including China and India. Guest believes the United States, with its diverse diasporas and array of lifestyles, has positioned itself as an appealing place for immigrants from all walks of life and can thus best benefit from immigration's rewards. -VERDICT Because this book addresses current immigration controversies and economic uncertainties, it will appeal to a variety of audiences in public and academic libraries. Recommended.-Caroline Geck, Peshine Avenue Preparatory Sch. Lib., Newark, NJ (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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