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Best African American fiction 2010 /

by Early, Gerald Lyn; Giovanni, Nikki.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Ballantine Books, c2010Description: xix, 313 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780553806908 :; 0553806904.Title notes: $25.00 12-2009 (db)Subject(s): American fiction -- African American authors | American fiction -- 21st century | African Americans -- Fiction
Contents:
Stories: The Ariran's last life / by Maria Eliza Hamilton Abegunde -- Three letters, one song & a refrain / by Chris Abani -- The Headstrong historian / by Chimananda Ngozi Adichie -- Bread and the land / by Jeffery Renard Allen -- Body and soul / by Wesley Brown -- Night coming / by Desiree Cooper -- Ghosts / by Edwidge Danticat -- Been meaning to say / by Amina Gautier -- The Torturer's wife / by Thomas Glave -- Prince Valiant works the black seam / by W. David Hall -- Out of body / by Glenville Lovell -- A Few good men / by David Nicholson. .
Novel excerpts: Excerpt from Yellow moon / by Jewell Parker Rhodes -- Microstories / by John Edgar Wideman -- The Gangstery / by Colson Whitehead -- Excerpt from Where the line bleeds / by Jesmyn Ward -- Arrivederci, aldo / by Kim Skyes.
Young adult fiction: Excerpt from Chains / by Laurie Halse Anderson -- Excerpt from Up for it: A Tale of the underground / by L.F. Haines -- Excerpt from Mary Jane / by Dorothy Sterling.
List(s) this item appears in: Black History Month
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Short Stories SS BES 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 39270003291659

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Bursting with energy and innovation, the second volume in the annual anthology collects the year's best short stories by African American authors.    Dealing with all aspects of life, from the pain of war to the warmth of family, the superb tales in Best African American Fiction 2010 are a tribute to the stunning imaginations thriving in today's African American literary community. Chosen by this year's guest editor, the legendary Nikki Giovanni, these works delve into international politics and personal histories, the clash of armies and of generations-and come from such publications as The New Yorker, Harper's, The Kenyon Review, and Callaloo. In "Ghosts," Edwidge Danticat portrays an aspiring radio talk show host in Bel Air-which some call the Baghdad of Haiti-who is brutally scapegoated, and in "Three Letters, One Song & a Refrain," Chris Abani gives a searing account of the violent life of a thirteen-year-old member of a Burmese hill tribe. Jeffery Renard Allen dramatizes the mysterious arrival in Harlem of a child's hated grandmother, and Wesley Brown fictionalizes the life of the great saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, with cameo appearances by Louis Armstrong, Fletcher Henderson, and other immortals. John Edgar Wideman contributes dense and textured "Microstories" that interweave everything from taboo sex acts to Richard Wright's last works to murder in a modern family. Desiree Cooper depicts a debutante from Atlanta moving to Detroit, "a city where there's no place to hide," while in "Been Meaning to Say," by Amina Gautier, a widower gets an unforgettable holiday visit from his resentful daughter. From Africa to Philadelphia, from the era of segregation to the age of Obama, the times and places, people and events inBest African American Fiction 2010reveal inconvenient truths through incomparable fiction.  

$25.00 12-2009 (db)

Includes bibliographical references.

Stories: The Ariran's last life / by Maria Eliza Hamilton Abegunde -- Three letters, one song & a refrain / by Chris Abani -- The Headstrong historian / by Chimananda Ngozi Adichie -- Bread and the land / by Jeffery Renard Allen -- Body and soul / by Wesley Brown -- Night coming / by Desiree Cooper -- Ghosts / by Edwidge Danticat -- Been meaning to say / by Amina Gautier -- The Torturer's wife / by Thomas Glave -- Prince Valiant works the black seam / by W. David Hall -- Out of body / by Glenville Lovell -- A Few good men / by David Nicholson. .

Novel excerpts: Excerpt from Yellow moon / by Jewell Parker Rhodes -- Microstories / by John Edgar Wideman -- The Gangstery / by Colson Whitehead -- Excerpt from Where the line bleeds / by Jesmyn Ward -- Arrivederci, aldo / by Kim Skyes.

Young adult fiction: Excerpt from Chains / by Laurie Halse Anderson -- Excerpt from Up for it: A Tale of the underground / by L.F. Haines -- Excerpt from Mary Jane / by Dorothy Sterling.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Chapter One The Ariran's Last Life Maria Eliza Hamilton Abegunde When the first big boats arrived, I had not yet married. Along with all the girls in my age group, I was learning what I would need to know to go to market, court a mate, and, for me, initiation. For months I had been told to be patient as my parents worked hard selling herbs and woven cloth every four days to traders. Every morning after prayers, they both instructed me in things I should know about the history of our village and our family lineage. Sometimes, they would let me help in the weaving of cloth that would be used in the ceremony. I liked, especially, the white with gold threads at the hem. My mother was a master weaver and sewer, and every lappa, bouba, shokoto, and gele had a small fish on the inside hem to let it be known it was she. There were three of us to enter the egbe right before the festivals started. We were excited, but frightened and curious. We had heard only of what was done but couldn't believe it. In the village, the wind blew warm air through the tops of our homes. We lived in a compound surrounded by outer walls, which had two doors. Between the walls and our homes was six feet of space where warriors were always on guard. A family lived together in one area with several connecting rooms. If a man had more than one wife, then each wife had her own room and kitchen for herself and her children, but there were common areas where everyone ate and talked during the day. You saw everyone once you stepped outside. It was better that way. When one of us needed something, we asked the person nearest. Not like I see the world has developed where you have to travel miles to reach another family member, or where you suffer in silence because you do not trust the person next door. In the compound, I knew who my aunts and uncles were, which ones would chide me or let me get away with something. We didn't always agree with one another, but we did not go to bed angry. When the wind blew, the dirt in the compound covered everything. When it rained, we moved our pots to the back room and sat inside to talk. The chickens and goats found shelter where they could. There was not ever the silence of loneliness or fear as there is now. The girls in my age group all worked together. We were really young obirin then, some of us being taller than our parents. Some of us had already filled out in our bodies, and we had started ase. I seemed to be taller and bigger than everyone and my mother began speaking to me of marriage, but I was not interested. We learned many new things every day. How to cook, sew, make our own containers, and how to care for ourselves. How to weave and bargain a good price for what we sold and bought. We learned how to bead so we could make our own belts and necklaces or do our hair. So many centuries have gone by that I do not remember all. I only remember wanting to learn because I saw what joy it brought my family. The day the first big boat arrived, I was sitting on a ledge above the water. I had finished my morning duty of straining herbs to be used in medicine. When they were ready, my mother would show me the next step of forming the compound. If I was lucky, she'd let me watch her work and assist as I had on other occasions. I had swept out the front room where my mother, father, and I gathered at night with my aunts and uncles. I had rolled our mats and placed them in a corner of the main room. My father had no other wives, so my tasks were simple but many. I wanted to be away from everyone. We were between the coast and nearest inland village. It took me half a morning to walk there, and half the afternoon to walk back. I did not always come so far, but that day I had longed for the water. My parents did not like me going to the sea, and whenever I mentioned the water they looked at each other and said nothing. In fact, they seemed to increase the speed of w Excerpted from Best African American Fiction 2010 by Gerald Early All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The African American experience is not monolithic but woven by occurrences that bind members of the expansive culture. This second annual anthology captures this diversity and follows the exhilarating debut edition by highlighting stories of Saturday barbershop lessons (David Nicholson's "A Few Good Men"), the challenges of upward mobility (Desiree Cooper's "Night Coming"), and generational divisions (Amina Gautier's "Been Meaning To Say"). The most beautiful and touching composition is award winner Chris Abani's "Three Letters, One Song & a Refrain," in which a young woman reflects on her spiritual battles in a war-torn country. Early (English, African, & African American studies, Washington Univ. in St. Louis) and this year's guest editor, poet Giovanni (Bicycles: Love Poems), impressively highlight quality urban fiction with Glenville Lovell's "Out of Body." Verdict Featuring recognized and fresh names, this series easily rivals Breaking Ice: An Anthology of Contemporary African-American Fiction (1990) and will appeal to all lovers of contemporary short story collections.-Ashanti White, Univ. of North Carolina at Greensboro (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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