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The magician's elephant /

by DiCamillo, Kate; Tanaka, Yoko [ill.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Somerville, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2009Edition: 1st ed.Description: 201 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780763644109; 0763644102; 9780763646349 (trade); 9780329786472 (Follett bdg.).Title notes: $16.99 9/9/2009 (hm)BRA $16.99 10/15/2009Subject(s): Orphans -- Juvenile fiction | Missing children -- Juvenile fiction | Elephants -- Juvenile fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Lost children -- Fiction | Adventure and adventurers -- Fiction | Chapter books | Adventure fictionSummary: When ten-year-old orphan Peter Augustus Duchene encounters a fortune teller in the marketplace one day who tells him that his sister, who is presumed dead, is in fact alive, he embarks on a remarkable series of adventures in an attempt to find her.
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Children's Collection Children's Fiction J DIC Available 39270003485962
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's Fiction J DIC Available 39270003188418

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Kate DiCamillo conjures a haunting fable about trusting the unexpected and making the extraordinary come true.What if? Why not? Could it be?When a fortuneteller's tent appears in the market square of the city of Baltese, orphan Peter Augustus Duchene knows the questions that he needs to ask: Does his sister still live? And if so, how can he find her? The fortuneteller's mysterious answer (an elephant! An elephant will lead him there!) sets off a chain of events so remarkable, so impossible, that you will hardly dare to believe it's true. With atmospheric illustrations by fine artist Yoko Tanaka, here is a dreamlike and captivating tale that could only be narrated by Newbery Medalist Kate DiCamillo. In this timeless fable, she evokes the largest of themes - hope and belonging, desire and compassion - with the lightness of a magician's touch.

Wilson's Children, October 2010

Wilson's Junior High School, January 2010

School Library Journal starred, August 2009

Booklist starred, July 2009

Library Media Connection starred, November 2009

Publisher's Weekly, August 2009

Kirkus Starred, August 2009

New York Times, December 2009

Horn Book, April 2010

Voice of Youth Advocates (V.O.Y.A.), August 2009

When ten-year-old orphan Peter Augustus Duchene encounters a fortune teller in the marketplace one day who tells him that his sister, who is presumed dead, is in fact alive, he embarks on a remarkable series of adventures in an attempt to find her.

5.5.

3-6 Follett Library Resources.

$16.99 9/9/2009 (hm)

BRA $16.99 10/15/2009

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Peter stood in the small patch of light making its sullen way through the open flap of the tent. He let the fortuneteller take his hand. She examined it closely, moving her eyes back and forth and back and forth, as if there a whole host of very small words inscribed there, an entire book about Peter Augustus Duchene composed atop his palm. "Huh," she said at last. She dropped his hand and squinted up at his face. "But, of course, you are just a boy." "I am ten years old," said Peter. He took the hat from his head and stood as straight and tall as he was able. "And I am training to become a soldier, brave and true. But it does not matter how old I am. You took the florit, so now you must give me my answer." "A soldier brave and true?" said the fortuneteller. She laughed and spat on the ground. "Very well, soldier brave and true, if you say it is so, then it is so. Ask me your question." Peter felt a small stab of fear. What if after all this time he could not bear the truth? What if he did not really want to know? "Speak," said the fortuneteller. "Ask." "My parents," said Peter. "That is your question?" said the fortuneteller. "They are dead." Peter's hands trembled. "That is not my question," he said. "I know that already. You must tell me something that I do not know. You must tell me of another -- you must tell me . . ." The fortuneteller narrowed her eyes. "Ah," she said. "Her? Your sister? That is your question? Very well. She lives." Peter's heart seized upon the words. She lives. She lives! "No, please," said Peter. He closed his eyes. He concentrated. "If she lives, then I must find her, so my question is, how I do I make my way there, to where she is?" He kept his eyes closed; he waited. "The elephant," said the fortuneteller. "What?" he said. He opened his eyes, certain that he had misunderstood. "You must follow the elephant," said the fortuneteller, "she will lead you there." Excerpted from The Magician's Elephant by Kate DiCamillo All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

(Intermediate) DiCamillo's allegorical novel seems to pack more mass per square inch than average. The plot is fantastical, surreal: in the fictional Old World city of Baltese, orphaned Peter searches for his sister (whom he has long thought dead), having been instructed by a fortuneteller to "follow the elephant." Against all odds, there is an elephant: conjured up by a magician by accident, it has landed on a woman's lap, crippling her. As DiCamillo expands her premise, she adds more and more characters to her cast ( la The Mouse and His Child), from a singing beggar to a countess to an old soldier fixated on war. The book's theme is the triumph of hope over despair, as Peter's belief that the "world is broken and it cannot be fixed" eventually gives way to a belief in possibility ("What if? Why not? Could it be?") -- familiar territory for this author (The Tale of Despereaux, rev. 9/03; The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, rev. 3/06). But its manifestation here is unusually varied, from homey (a nourishing soup Peter's new mother feeds him) to ecstatic (a nun's dream of flying over a glowing Earth). And the prose is remarkable, reflecting influences from Kafka to the theater of the absurd to Laurel-and-Hardy humor. Even DiCamillo's characters influence the language: in scenes revolving around the self-important countess, the prose becomes verbose, repetitive, full of embedded parentheses. The novel's virtuosity, however, creates a distance between book and reader that may confound the author's fans. This may not be a crowd-pleaser, but it's an impressive addition to the DiCamillo canon. From HORN BOOK, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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