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Anthem /

by Rand, Ayn.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Dutton, 2005Edition: Centennial ed. / with an introduction and appendix by Leonard Peikoff.Description: 253 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0525948937 :; 9780525948933.Title notes: $23.95 8-2009 (db)Subject(s): Men -- Psychology -- Fiction | Individuality -- Fiction | Time travel -- Fiction | Psychological fiction | Science fiction | Love storiesSummary: Equality 7-2521 lives in the Dark Ages of the future, where all decisions are made by committee, all people live in collectives, all traces of individualism have been wiped out. But the spark of individual thought and freedom still burns in Equality 7-2521, a passion which he has been taught to call sinful. In a purely egalitarian world, he dares to stand forth from the herd -- to think and choose for himself, to discover electricity, and to love the woman of his choice. Now he has been marked for death for committing the ultimate sin: in a world where the great "we" reign supreme, he has rediscovered the lost and holy word "I". This provocative book is an anthem sung in praise of man's ego.
List(s) this item appears in: Jewish Book Month/Authors
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Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult Science Fiction SF RAN Available 39270003035965

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Anthem is Ayn Rand's classic tale of a dystopian future of the great "We"--a world that deprives individuals of a name or independence--that anticipates her later masterpieces, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged .<br> <br> They existed only to serve the state. They were conceived in controlled Palaces of Mating. They died in the Home of the Useless. From cradle to grave, the crowd was one--the great WE.<br> <br> In all that was left of humanity there was only one man who dared to think, seek, and love. He lived in the dark ages of the future. In a loveless world, he dared to love the woman of his choice. In an age that had lost all trace of science and civilization, he had the courage to seek and find knowledge. But these were not the crimes for which he would be hunted. He was marked for death because he had committed the unpardonable sin: He had stood forth from the mindless human herd. He was a man alone. He had rediscovered the lost and holy word--I.<br> <br> "I worship individuals for their highest possibilities as individuals, and I loathe humanity, for its failure to live up to these possibilities."--Ayn Rand

$23.95 8-2009 (db)

Includes a facsim. of the original English ed., published in 1938, with Rand's editorial changes for the American ed. in her own hand.

Equality 7-2521 lives in the Dark Ages of the future, where all decisions are made by committee, all people live in collectives, all traces of individualism have been wiped out. But the spark of individual thought and freedom still burns in Equality 7-2521, a passion which he has been taught to call sinful. In a purely egalitarian world, he dares to stand forth from the herd -- to think and choose for himself, to discover electricity, and to love the woman of his choice. Now he has been marked for death for committing the ultimate sin: in a world where the great "we" reign supreme, he has rediscovered the lost and holy word "I". This provocative book is an anthem sung in praise of man's ego.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The difference between this long-forgotten exercise in paranoia and other futuristic visions of a world controlled by the state, such as Aldous Huxley's or George Orwell's, is the extremist tone of Rand's story. The author lived in a black-and-white world in which things social or communal are evil and things individual and selfish are exalted. This "anthem" culminates in a hymn to the concepts of "I" and "ego," where the rebels are those who resist group action; the oppressors are government officials and others who attempt to provide a safety net for the less fortunate. The production is not improved by the theatricality of narrator Paul Meier, which is reminiscent of a ham Victorian actor intoning an overwrought melodrama. Not recommended.-Mark Pumphrey, Polk Cty. P.L., Columbus, NC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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