Negro with a hat : the rise and fall of Marcus Garvey /

by Grant, Colin.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008Description: 530 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780195367942 (alk. paper) :; 0195367944 (alk. paper).Title notes: $27.95 7-2008 (db)Subject(s): Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 | African Americans -- Biography | Black nationalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Race identity | Back to Africa movement | Universal Negro Improvement Association -- History | Jamaica -- Biography
Contents:
Prologue : a premature death -- Bury the dead and take care of the living -- Almost an Englishman -- In the company of Negroes -- An ebony orator in Harlem -- No flag but the Stars and Stripes-- and possibly the Union Jack -- If we must die -- How to manufacture a traitor -- Harlem speaks for scattered Ethiopia -- Flyin' home on the Black Star Line -- A star in the storm -- He who plays the king -- Last stop Liberia -- Not to mention his colour -- Behold the demagogue or misunderstood messiah -- Caging the tiger -- Into the furnace -- Silence Mr. Garvey -- Gone to foreign.
Summary: Marcus Mosiah Garvey was once the most famous black man on earth. A brilliant orator who electrified his audiences, he inspired thousands to join his "Back to Africa" movement, aiming to create an independent homeland through Pan-African emigration--yet he was barred from the continent by colonial powers. This self-educated, poetry-writing aesthete was a shrewd promoter whose use of pageantry fired the imagination of his followers. At the pinnacle of his fame in the early 1920s, Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association boasted millions of members in more than forty countries, and he was an influential champion of the Harlem Renaissance. J. Edgar Hoover was so alarmed by Garvey that he labored for years to prosecute him, finally using dubious charges for which Garvey served several years in an Atlanta prison. This biography restores Garvey to his place as one of the founders of black nationalism and a key figure of the 20th century.--From publisher description.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

New in paperback, this groundbreaking biography captures the full sweep and epic dimensions of Marcus Garvey's life, the dazzling triumphs and the dreary exile. As Grant shows, Garvey was a man of contradictions: a self-educated, poetry-writing aesthete and unabashed propagandist, an admirer of Lenin, and a dandy given to elaborate public displays. Above all, he was a shrewd promoter whose use of pageantry evoked a lost African civilization and fired the imagination of his followers. Negro With a Hat restores Garvey to his place as one of the founders of black nationalism and a key figure of the 20th century.<br> <br> "A searching, vivid, and (as the title suggests) complex account of Garvey's short but consequential life."<br> --Steve Hahn, The New Republic<br> <br> "The story of Marcus Garvey, the charismatic and tireless black leader who had a meteoric rise and fall in the late 1910s and early '20s, makes for enthralling reading, and Garvey has found an engaging and objective biographer in Colin Grant.... Grant's book is not all politics, ideology, money and lawsuits. It is also an engrossing social history.... Negro With a Hat is an achievement on a scale Garvey might have appreciated."<br> --New York Times Book Review<br> <br> "Dazzling, definitive biography of the controversial activist who led the 1920s 'Back to Africa' movement.... Grant's learned passion for his subject shimmers on every page. A riveting and well-wrought volume that places Garvey solidly in the pantheon of important 20th-century black leaders."<br> --Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)<br> <br> "This splendid book is certain to become the definitive biography. Garvey was a dreamer and a doer; Grant captures the fascination of both."<br> --Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)<br> <br> "Grant's strength lies in his ability to re-create political moods and offer compelling sketches of colorful individuals and their organizations.... An engaging and readable introduction to a complicated and contentious historical actor who, in his time, possessed a unique capacity to inspire devotion and hatred, adulation and fear."<br> --Chicago Tribune<br> <br> "A monumental, nuanced and broadly sympathetic portrait."<br> --Financial Times<br>

$27.95 7-2008 (db)

Includes bibliographical references (p. [456]-464) and index.

Marcus Mosiah Garvey was once the most famous black man on earth. A brilliant orator who electrified his audiences, he inspired thousands to join his "Back to Africa" movement, aiming to create an independent homeland through Pan-African emigration--yet he was barred from the continent by colonial powers. This self-educated, poetry-writing aesthete was a shrewd promoter whose use of pageantry fired the imagination of his followers. At the pinnacle of his fame in the early 1920s, Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association boasted millions of members in more than forty countries, and he was an influential champion of the Harlem Renaissance. J. Edgar Hoover was so alarmed by Garvey that he labored for years to prosecute him, finally using dubious charges for which Garvey served several years in an Atlanta prison. This biography restores Garvey to his place as one of the founders of black nationalism and a key figure of the 20th century.--From publisher description.

Prologue : a premature death -- Bury the dead and take care of the living -- Almost an Englishman -- In the company of Negroes -- An ebony orator in Harlem -- No flag but the Stars and Stripes-- and possibly the Union Jack -- If we must die -- How to manufacture a traitor -- Harlem speaks for scattered Ethiopia -- Flyin' home on the Black Star Line -- A star in the storm -- He who plays the king -- Last stop Liberia -- Not to mention his colour -- Behold the demagogue or misunderstood messiah -- Caging the tiger -- Into the furnace -- Silence Mr. Garvey -- Gone to foreign.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Illustrations (p. ix)
  • Prologue: A Premature Death (p. 1)
  • 1 Bury the Dead and Take Care of the Living (p. 4)
  • 2 Almost an Englishman (p. 34)
  • 3 In the Company of Negroes (p. 52)
  • 4 An Ebony Orator in Harlem (p. 73)
  • 5 No Flag but the Stars and Stripes - and Possibly the Union Jack (p. 95)
  • 6 If We Must Die (p. 114)
  • 7 How to Manufacture a Traitor (p. 131)
  • 8 Harlem Speaks for Scattered Ethiopia (p. 160)
  • 9 Flyin' Home on the Black Star Line (p. 184)
  • 10 A Star in the Storm (p. 217)
  • 11 He Who Plays the King (p. 242)
  • 12 Last Stop Liberia (p. 268)
  • 13 Not to Mention His Colour (p. 298)
  • 14 Behold the Demagogue or Misunderstood Messiah (p. 318)
  • 15 Caging the Tiger (p. 349)
  • 16 Into the Furnace (p. 388)
  • 17 Silence Mr Garvey (p. 413)
  • 18 Gone to Foreign (p. 436)
  • Epilogue (p. 451)
  • Bibliography (p. 456)
  • Notes (p. 465)
  • Acknowledgments (p. 505)
  • Index (p. 507)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

A great biography reveals the personality of its subject chapter by chapter, but Grant's dreary book lacks the coherence or demonstrated research to do that. Garvey built an international organization focused on uniting and advancing Africans and those of African descent globally, and any biography of him should demonstrate why so many people believed in his movement and continue to do so. Grant (producer, BBC Radio) quotes James Weldon Johnson, who echoed many contemporaries in observing that Garvey had a "magnetic personality, torrential eloquence, and intuitive knowledge of crowd psychology." It is hence puzzling that this biographer omits Garvey's own words, especially as Garvey's speeches and papers have been collected and published. In this slanted portrait (Garvey is called "a supreme opportunistic propagandist"), there is little about Garvey's own life. The most interesting parts of the book are about others, including Garvey's mentors, Duse Mohamed Ali and Hubert Harrison, and one of his followers, Josie Gatlin. But there is too much biographical information about fellow Jamaican Claude McKay, who was not a follower of Garvey, and W.E.B. DuBois, whose NAACP competed with Garvey's Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) for members and staff. Libraries should have Rupert Lewis's Marcus Garvey: Anti-Colonial Champion, which includes a chapter about Garvey's oratorical skills, instead of this disappointing book. Not recommended. (Index not seen.)-Tonya Briggs, Oberlin Coll. Lib., OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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