Criss cross /

by Perkins, Lynne Rae.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Greenwillow Books, 2005Edition: 1st ed.Description: 337 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0060092726 (trade); 0060092734 (lib. bdg.) :.Title notes: j $17.89 3/21/2006j $17.89 3/21/2006$16.99 (YA) 8/7/2006Subject(s): Newbery Medal | Newbery Medal -- 2006 | Identity (Philosophical concept) -- Juvenile fiction | Nineteen sixties -- Juvenile fiction | Identity -- Fiction | Nineteen sixties -- Fiction | Juvenile materials
Contents:
The catch -- Hector goes into a sponge state and has a satori -- Boys, dogs, science fiction -- Radio show -- Leg buds -- In the rhododendrons -- The fable of Lenny -- Easy basin wrench, or Debbie has a mechanical moment, too -- Guitar lessons -- Conversation in the dark: brilliant eskimo thoughts -- Hector's first song -- Truck lessons -- Ravine -- Japanese chapter -- Guitar progress -- Home work -- At the Tastee-freez on a Tuesday evening -- In and out of the cocoon -- Where the necklace went -- Hair -- Confession -- Wuthering heights/Popular mechanics -- The childhood friend -- Grosi -- Meanwhile -- Somewhere else -- Meanwhile, elsewhere -- Mrs. Bruning -- Elephants -- What Patty said when Debbie showed her the photo -- California of the mind -- Dan Persik's progress -- A pig roast -- Roasting the pig -- Sarong -- Flip-flop, necklace -- On the roof -- lightning bugs.
Summary: Teenagers in a small town in the 1960s experience new thoughts and feelings, question their identities, connect, and disconnect as they search for the meaning of life and love.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Debbie is wishing something would happen. Something good. To her. Soon. In the meantime, Debbie loses a necklace and finds a necklace (and boy does the necklace have a story to tell), she goes jeans shopping with her mother (an accomplishment in diplomacy), she learns to drive shift in a truck (illegally), she saves a life (directly connected to being able to drive, thus proving something), she takes a bus ride to another town (in order to understand what it feels like to be from "elsewhere"), she meets a boy (who truly is from "elsewhere"), but mostly she hangs out with her friends: Patty, Hector, Lenny, and Phil. Their paths cross. Their stories crisscross. And in Lynne Rae Perkins's remarkable book, a girl and her wish grow up. Illustrated throughout with black-and-white pictures, comics, and photographs by the author.</p> <p>Ages 10+</p>

j $17.89 3/21/2006

j $17.89 3/21/2006

$16.99 (YA) 8/7/2006

The catch -- Hector goes into a sponge state and has a satori -- Boys, dogs, science fiction -- Radio show -- Leg buds -- In the rhododendrons -- The fable of Lenny -- Easy basin wrench, or Debbie has a mechanical moment, too -- Guitar lessons -- Conversation in the dark: brilliant eskimo thoughts -- Hector's first song -- Truck lessons -- Ravine -- Japanese chapter -- Guitar progress -- Home work -- At the Tastee-freez on a Tuesday evening -- In and out of the cocoon -- Where the necklace went -- Hair -- Confession -- Wuthering heights/Popular mechanics -- The childhood friend -- Grosi -- Meanwhile -- Somewhere else -- Meanwhile, elsewhere -- Mrs. Bruning -- Elephants -- What Patty said when Debbie showed her the photo -- California of the mind -- Dan Persik's progress -- A pig roast -- Roasting the pig -- Sarong -- Flip-flop, necklace -- On the roof -- lightning bugs.

Teenagers in a small town in the 1960s experience new thoughts and feelings, question their identities, connect, and disconnect as they search for the meaning of life and love.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • 1 The Catch (p. 1)
  • 2 Hector Goes Into a Sponge State and Has a Satori (p. 5)
  • 3 Boys, Dogs, Science Fiction (p. 27)
  • 4 Radio Show (p. 32)
  • 5 Leg Buds (p. 38)
  • 6 In the Rhododendrons (p. 42)
  • 7 The Fable of Lenny (p. 52)
  • 8 Easy Basin Wrench, or Debbie Has a Mechanical Moment, Too (p. 65)
  • 9 Guitar Lessons (p. 69)
  • 10 Conversation in the Dark: Brilliant Eskimo Thoughts (p. 85)
  • 11 Hector's First Song (p. 92)
  • 12 Truck Lessons (p. 94)
  • 13 Ravine (p. 105)
  • 14 Japanese Chapter (p. 119)
  • 15 Guitar Progress (p. 129)
  • 16 Home Work (p. 131)
  • 17 At the Tastee-Freez on a Tuesday Evening (p. 151)
  • 18 In and Out of the Cocoon (p. 161)
  • 19 Where the Necklace Went (p. 184)
  • 20 Hair (p. 187)
  • 21 Confession (p. 191)
  • 22 Wuthering Heights/Popular Mechanics (p. 200)
  • 23 The Childhood Friend (p. 205)
  • 24 Grosi (p. 210)
  • 25 Meanwhile (p. 239)
  • 26 Somewhere Else (p. 257)
  • 27 Meanwhile, Elsewhere (p. 271)
  • 28 Mrs. Bruning (p. 273)
  • 29 Elephants (p. 277)
  • 30 What Patty Said When Debbie Showed Her the Photo (p. 284)
  • 31 California of the Mind (p. 285)
  • 32 Dan Persik's Progress (p. 289)
  • 33 A Pig Roast (p. 293)
  • 34 Roasting the Pig (p. 296)
  • 35 Sarong (p. 301)
  • 36 Flip-Flop, Necklace (p. 305)
  • 37 On the Roof (p. 307)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">Criss Cross Chapter One The Catch She wished something would happen. She wished it while she was looking at a magazine. The magazine was her sister Chrisanne's; so was the bed she was sitting on and the sweater Debbie had decided to borrow after coming into Chrisanne's room to use her lip gloss. Chrisanne wasn't there. She had gone off somewhere. Thinking she should be more specific in case her wish came true, even though it wasn't an official wish, it was just a thought, Debbie thought, I wish something different would happen. Something good. To me. As she thought it, she wound her finger in the necklace she was wearing, which was her own, then unwound it again. It was a short necklace, and she could only wrap her finger in it twice. At least while it was still around her neck. The article she was looking at was about how the most important thing was to be yourself. Although the pictures that went with it recommended being someone else. Looking at them together made it seem like you could do both at the same time. Debbie checked her wish for loopholes, because of all those stories about wishes that come true but cause disasters at the same time. Like King Midas turning his daughter and all of his food into gold. Even in her own life, Debbie remembered that once, when she was little, she had shouted that she wished everyone would just leave her alone. And then everyone did. The trouble with being too careful about your wishes, though, was that you could end up with a wish so shapeless that it could come true and you wouldn't even know it, or it wouldn't matter. She wrapped the necklace around her finger again, and this time it popped loose, flinging itself from her neck onto a bright, fuzzy photograph of a boy and a girl, laughing, having fun against a backdrop of sparkling water. Debbie picked up her necklace and jiggled the catch. It stuck sometimes in a partly open position, and the connecting loop could slip out. Something like that, she thought, looking at the photo. Wondering if it would require being a different person. In a way that doesn't hurt anyone or cause any natural disasters, she added, out of habit. Fastening the chain back around her neck, trying to tell by feel whether the catch had closed, she thought of another loophole. Hoping it wasn't too late to tack on one more condition, she thought the word soon. The wish floated off, and she turned the page. Meanwhile, in another part of town, Hector's sister, Rowanne, was upstairs in her bedroom, changing her clothes or something. Hector could hear her humming, and the sound of drawers opening and closing. He was crossing the front hall on his way to the kitchen and, as he passed the mirror, he glanced in and gave himself a little smile. It was something he always did; he didn't know why. For encouragement, maybe. This time he smiled hello at himself just as a slanted ray of sun shot through one of the diamond-shaped windows in the front door at the side of his face, producing a sort of side-lit, golden, disembodied-head effect in the mirror. It struck him as an improvement on the usual averageness of his face; it added some drama. Some intrigue. An aura of inter-estingness his sister's face had all the time, but his did not, which mystified him because when he compared their features one at a time, a lot of them seemed identical. Or almost identical. There were some small differences. Like their hair. Their hair was different. They both had auburn hair, but while Rowanne's auburn hair plummeted in a serene, graceful waterfall to her waist, Hector's shot out from his head in wiry, dissenting clumps. And while both of their faces were slim, freckled ovals with a hint of roundness, Hector's was rounder. Rowanne had slipped away from her roly-poly childhood like a sylph from a cocoon, but Hector's was still wrapped around him in a soft, wooly layer. Their eyes were blue-gray, behind almost identical wire-rimmed glasses resting on very similar slender noses. But Rowanne's eyes-glasses-nose constellation somehow conveyed intelligence and warmth. Hector's conveyed friendly and goofy. Why? What was the difference? Maybe it was his eyes, he was thinking. Maybe they were too close together. Maybe they would move farther apart as he matured, like a flounder's. Although when he thought about it, he seemed to remember that both the flounder's eyes ended up on the same side of its face. He tried to remember what made that happen, if it was something the flounder did, and if maybe he could do the opposite. Perhaps it would help that he wasn't lying on the bottom of the ocean watching for food to float by. He definitely felt unfinished, still in process. He felt that there was still time, that by the time three years had passed and he was seventeen, as Rowanne was now, he, too, might coalesce into something. Maybe not something as remarkable as Rowanne, but something. It was possible, he felt. Hector took off his glasses to see if his eyes looked better without them. He looked blurrier, which seemed to heighten the cinematic, enigmatic quality lent by the falling sun's sideways glance. His clumpy hair dissolved softly into the shadows, and the effort he had to make to see gave an intense, piercing quality to his gaze. Maybe corrected vision wasn't all it was cracked up to be. Maybe in ancient times, when distinct edges were unknown to many people, he would have been considered handsome. Though he might have had a lot of headaches. The sun dropped a degree and the golden disembodied moment passed. Hector put his glasses back on and was about to turn away when a sharp jab of weight on his shoulder made him jump. It was Rowanne's chin. She had sneaked up behind him, and her face appeared next to his in the mirror. So much like his, but more. There was just no explaining it. Criss Cross . Copyright © by Lynne Perkins. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

(Middle School, High School) Catching fireflies in a jar, fourteen-year-old Debbie (first met in Perkins's spectacular debut novel All Alone in the Universe, rev. 9/99) watches the bugs' ""glow parts go on and off,"" appeasing her guilt over capturing them by convincing herself that ""once they were free, their small, basic brains would...have no memory of being imprisoned."" Perkins's wonderfully contemplative and relaxed yet captivating second novel, again illustrated with her own perfectly idiosyncratic spot art, is a collection of fleeting images and sensations -- some pleasurable, some painful, some a mix of both -- from her ensemble cast's lives. Like All Alone in the Universe, the story is set in a 1970s small town, but teen readers won't have to be aware of the time period to feel connected to Debbie, Hector, Lenny, and the rest as the third-person narrative floats back and forth between their often humorous, gradually evolving perspectives. The book's title refers to a radio show that the neighborhood teens listen to on Saturday evenings; on a thematic level, it also refers to those barely perceptible moments of missed communication between a boy and a girl, a parent and a child, when ""something might have happened"" but didn't. In keeping with Perkins's almost Zen-like tone, such flubbed opportunities are viewed as unfortunate but not tragic. ""Maybe it was another time that their moments would meet."" Like a lazy summer day, the novel induces that exhilarating feeling that one has all the time in the world. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

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