Everywhere you don't belong : a novel /

by Bump, Gabriel [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chapel Hill, North Carolina : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2020.Edition: First edition.Description: 264 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781616208790; 1616208791.Other title: Everywhere you do not belong.Subject(s): African Americans -- Fiction | Racism -- Fiction | Grandparent and child -- Fiction | Riots -- Fiction | College students -- FictionSummary: A darkly funny and heartfelt debut novel about what it means to grow up young and black on the south side of Chicago when it feels like your choices are slim to none.Summary: Claude McKay Love is an average kid coping with abandonment, violence, riots, failed love, and societal pressures. As a young black man born on the South Side of Chicago, he is raised by his civil rights-era grandmother, who tries to shape him into a principled actor for change. When riots consume his neighborhood he hesitates to take sides, unwilling to let race define his life. He decides to escape Chicago to go to college, find a new identity, and leave the pressure cooker of his hometown behind. Is there is any safe haven for a young black man in this time and place called America? -- adapted from jacket
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p> "A comically dark coming-of-age story about growing up on the South Side of Chicago, but it's also social commentary at its finest, woven seamlessly into the work . . . Bump's meditation on belonging and not belonging, where or with whom, how love is a way home no matter where you are, is handled so beautifully that you don't know he's hypnotized you until he's done." --Tommy Orange, The New York Times Book Review In this alternately witty and heartbreaking debut novel, Gabriel Bump gives us an unforgettable protagonist, Claude McKay Love. Claude isn't dangerous or brilliant--he's an average kid coping with abandonment, violence, riots, failed love, and societal pressures as he steers his way past the signposts of youth: childhood friendships, basketball tryouts, first love, first heartbreak, picking a college, moving away from home. <br> <br> Claude just wants a place where he can fit. As a young black man born on the South Side of Chicago, he is raised by his civil rights-era grandmother, who tries to shape him into a principled actor for change; yet when riots consume his neighborhood, he hesitates to take sides, unwilling to let race define his life. He decides to escape Chicago for another place, to go to college, to find a new identity, to leave the pressure cooker of his hometown behind. But as he discovers, he cannot; there is no safe haven for a young black man in this time and place called America. <br> <br> Percolating with fierceness and originality, attuned to the ironies inherent in our twenty-first-century landscape, Everywhere You Don't Belong marks the arrival of a brilliant young talent.<br> <br> </p>

A darkly funny and heartfelt debut novel about what it means to grow up young and black on the south side of Chicago when it feels like your choices are slim to none.

Claude McKay Love is an average kid coping with abandonment, violence, riots, failed love, and societal pressures. As a young black man born on the South Side of Chicago, he is raised by his civil rights-era grandmother, who tries to shape him into a principled actor for change. When riots consume his neighborhood he hesitates to take sides, unwilling to let race define his life. He decides to escape Chicago to go to college, find a new identity, and leave the pressure cooker of his hometown behind. Is there is any safe haven for a young black man in this time and place called America? -- adapted from jacket

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

DEBUT "I want to know who I am!" exclaims Claude McKay Love in this pointedly affecting debut novel, which opens in Chicago's South Shore neighborhood. Claude is a nerdy, timid outsider, raised by a sharp-tongued grandma from the civil rights movement who will do anything, even burn her beloved Dennis Rodman cardboard cutout, to expunge Claude's unhappiness after his parents vanish, and he's aware that his family expects great things of him, though he doesn't yet know whether he can deliver. Meanwhile, he considers his options, wondering whether he should stay or leave, as any young person might. That should be enough, but the simple act of trying out choices takes on a sharper edge when you're from a community shaped by the legacy of racism and beset by police brutality and street toughs who terrorize the protagonists yet are themselves trying to understand where they belong. After a deadly riot, Claude's effort to find himself carries him to college in Missouri, where he's joined by sort-of girlfriend Janice and works on the student newspaper. Yet he can't escape being defined by others as African American, instead of just as Claude, and again flees violence with Janice toward a place they might belong. VERDICT With deft writing and rat-a-tat, laugh-until-you-gasp-at-the-implications dialog, Bump delivers a singular sense of growing up black that will resonate with readers. [See Prepub Alert, 7/1/19.]--Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

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