Bone Hollow /

by Ventrella, Kim [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Scholastic Press, [2019]Edition: First edition.Description: 226 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781338042740; 1338042742.Subject(s): Death -- Juvenile fiction | Future life -- Juvenile fiction | Orphans -- Juvenile fiction | Dogs -- Juvenile fiction | Helping behavior -- Juvenile fiction | Death -- Fiction | Future life -- Fiction | Ghosts -- Fiction | Orphans -- Fiction | Dogs -- Fiction | Helpfulness -- Fiction | JUVENILE FICTION -- General | Young adult fiction | Juvenile works | JUVENILE FICTION / General | Young adult works | Action and adventure fiction | Fiction | Juvenile works | Action and adventure fictionSummary: Gabe was on top of his guardian's roof, trying to rescue her prize chicken and worrying about his dog, Ollie, when the tornado struck, and after that he was dead, though it takes some time for him to realize it; but somehow he is still tied to this world and generally only those who are close to death can actually see him (although there is a bit of a panic when he shows up at his own funeral)--and in that he discovers his new mission in "life:" helping others before they cross over into the light.
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Children's Collection Children's New Book Shelf J VEN Checked out 09/14/2020 39270004891382

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Gabe knows it was foolish to save that chicken. On the roof. In the middle of a storm. Yet Gabe also knows that his guardian, Ms. Cleo, loves the chicken more than him. After falling off the roof, Gabe wakes up to find his neighbors staring at him tearfully. To his confusion, none of them seem to hear Gabe speak. It's almost as if they think he's dead. But Gabe's NOT dead. He feels fine! So why does everyone scream in terror when he shows up to his own funeral?<br> <br> Gabe flees with his dog, Ollie, the only creature who doesn't tremble at the sight of him. So when a mysterious girl named Wynne offers to let Gabe stay at her cozy house in a misty clearing, he gratefully accepts. Yet Wynne disappears from Bone Hollow for long stretches of time, and when a suspicious Gabe follows her, he makes a mind-blowing discovery. Wynne is Death and has been for thousands of years. Even more shocking . . . she's convinced that Gabe is destined to replace her.

Gabe was on top of his guardian's roof, trying to rescue her prize chicken and worrying about his dog, Ollie, when the tornado struck, and after that he was dead, though it takes some time for him to realize it; but somehow he is still tied to this world and generally only those who are close to death can actually see him (although there is a bit of a panic when he shows up at his own funeral)--and in that he discovers his new mission in "life:" helping others before they cross over into the light.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Horn Book Review

Accompanied by his loyal dog, an orphaned boy confronts the afterlife in this middle-grade exploration of the meaning of death and family. Gabe is impaled by a weathervane while trying to rescue his guardians prized chickens from a tornado. When he regains consciousness, he assumes nothing has changed, and doesnt understand why the neighbors are ignoring him. Gradually Gabe realizes that he died in the accident, and his dog Ollie is the only one who still sees him. Gabe ends up in the misty valley of Bone Hollow under the protection of a shapeshifting girl named Wynne. Wynnes job is to help dying people transition to the afterlife, and after more than a century of being undead, she is exhausted and ready to train Gabe to take her place. He is terrified at first but eventually comes to terms with death as a natural part of living and learns the value of being supportive to people going through any unsettling change. Ventrellas (Skeleton Tree, rev. 11/17) writing is vivid, and although the story could be tighter (Gabes fate is obvious to the reader, so his ongoing confusion grows repetitive), the novel stands up as an unsentimental look at loss. sarah rettger January/February 2019 p 106(c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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