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The year we fell from space /

by King, A. S. (Amy Sarig) [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., 2019.Edition: First edition.Description: 262 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781338236361; 1338236369.Subject(s): Depression, Mental -- Juvenile fiction | Meteorites -- Juvenile fiction | Divorce -- Juvenile fiction | Dysfunctional families -- Juvenile fiction | Sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction | Mothers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction | Bullying -- Juvenile fiction | Depression, Mental -- Fiction | Meteorites -- Fiction | Divorce -- Fiction | Family life -- Fiction | Sisters -- Fiction | Parent and child -- Fiction | Bullying -- FictionSummary: Middle schooler Liberty likes to make her own maps of the stars, in fact she is obsessed with them, especially since her family is falling apart; her parents are getting divorced, her nine-year-old sister will barely leave the house and carries a stuffed tiger at all times, her father is suffering from depression, but will not talk about it, and the brothers down the street, once friends, have turned into bullies--so when a tiny meteorite literally falls in her lap it is like a sign, but a sign of what?
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's New Book Shelf J KIN Available 39270004879148

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The deeply affecting next book from acclaimed author Amy Sarig King. <br> <br> Liberty Johansen is going to change the way we look at the night sky. Most people see the old constellations, the things they've been told to see. But Liberty sees new patterns, pictures, and possibilities. She's an exception.<br> <br> Some other exceptions:<br> <br> Her dad, who gave her the stars. Who moved out months ago and hasn't talked to her since.<br> <br> Her mom, who's happier since he left, even though everyone thinks she should be sad and lonely.<br> <br> And her sister, who won't go outside their house.<br> <br> Liberty feels like her whole world is falling from space. Can she map a new life for herself and her family before they spin too far out of reach?

Middle schooler Liberty likes to make her own maps of the stars, in fact she is obsessed with them, especially since her family is falling apart; her parents are getting divorced, her nine-year-old sister will barely leave the house and carries a stuffed tiger at all times, her father is suffering from depression, but will not talk about it, and the brothers down the street, once friends, have turned into bullies--so when a tiny meteorite literally falls in her lap it is like a sign, but a sign of what?

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Horn Book Review

Twelve-year-old "amateur creative astronomer" Liberty Johansen, having memorized all the constellations, makes up her own and meticulously maps them. Her love of the cosmos comes from her father-who, at the start of the book, is separating from Liberty's mother, his severe depression (and, we find out later, infidelity) too much strain to bear. Liberty thinks of it as their family's "free fall from space," but then something does fall from space-a meteorite, which begins communicating with her. The meteorite offers comfort, as Liberty worries about her younger sister Jilly, who doesn't want to leave the house; her own mental health ("maybe we should have gone with Dad and not stayed with Mom. Because if something happens to my brain, I don't want her to kick me out too"); and the whole boy-girl thing, having been "excommunicated" from sixth grade for making fun of the pretend recess-time weddings ("It was the Tuesday after my dad moved out. Of course I thought weddings were stupid"). As she navigates her new family structure, Liberty loses her love for the stars and for herself before, cathartically, reconnecting with both. King (Me and Marvin Gardens, rev. 1/17, for middle graders; and her masterful YA oeuvre including Ask the Passengers, rev. 1/13, and, most recently Dig., rev. 3/19) is keenly attuned to her characters' humanity, from the core family members to Dad's new girlfriend to the neighbors going through a parallel family breakup. As always, the author's sensitivity to her characters' situational challenges is stunningly, compassionately insightful-and her narrative voice and just-this-side-of-realism setting uniquely her own. Elissa Gershowitz November/December 2019 p.89(c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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