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K-punk : the collected and unpublished writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016) /

by Fisher, Mark; Ambrose, Darren [editor.]; Reynolds, Simon [author of foreword.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London, UK : Repeater Books, an imprint of Watkins Media Ltd, 2018.Description: 817 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781912248285; 191224828X.Other title: Collected and unpublished writings of Mark Fisher (2004-2016).Uniform titles: Works. Selections.Subject(s): Philosophy, Modern -- 21st Century | Civilization, Modern -- 21st century -- History and criticism | Popular culture -- 21st century -- History and criticism | Punk culture -- Great Britain | Criticism, interpretation, etc | Essays
Contents:
Foreword / Simon Reynolds -- Editor's introduction / Darren Ambrose -- Why K?
Part one: Methods of dreaming: books (Book meme ; Space, time, light, all the essentials: reflections on J.G. Ballard season (BBC 4) ; Why I want to fuck Ronald Reagan ; A fairground's painted swings ; What are the politics of boredom?: (Ballard 2003 Remix) ; Let me be your fantasy ; Fantasy kits: Steven Meisel's "State of emergency" ; The assassination of J. G. Ballard ; A world of dread and fear ; Ripley's glam ; Methods of dreaming ; Atwood's anti-capitalism ; Toy stories: puppets, dolls and horror stories ; Zer0 Books statement)
Part two: Screens, dreams and spectres: film and television (A spoonful of sugar ; She's not my mother ; Stand up, Nigel Barton ; Portmeirion: an ideal for living ; Golgothic materialism ; This movie doesn't move me ; Fear and misery in the Third Reich 'n' Roll ; We want it all ; Gothic Oedipus: subjectivity and capitalism in Christiopher Nolan's Batman begins ; When we dream, do we dream we're Joey? ; Notes on Cronenberg's eXistenZ ; I filmed it so I didn't have to remember it myself ; Spectres of marker and the reality of the Third Way ; Dis-identity politics ; "You have always been the caretaker": the spectral spaces of the Overlook Hotel ; Coffee bars and internment camps ; Rebel without a cause ; Robot historian in the ruins ; Review of Tyson ; "They killed their mother": Avatar as ideological symbol ; Precarity and paternalism ; Return of the gift: Richard Kelly's The box ; Contributing to society ; "Just relax and enjoy it": Geworfenheit on the BBC ; Star Wars was a sell-out from the start ; Gillian Wearing: Self made ; Batman's political right turn ; Remember who the enemy is ; Beyond good and evil: Breaking bad ; Classless broadcasting: Benefits Street ; Rooting for the enemy: The Americans ; How to let go: The leftovers, Broadchurch and The missing ; The strange death of British satire ; Review: Terminator Genisys ; The house that fame built: Celebrity Big Brother ; Sympathy for the androids: the twisted morality of Westworld)
Part three: Choose your weapons: writing on music (The by now traditional Glasto rant ; Art pop, no, really ; k-punk, or the glampunk art pop discontinuum ; Noise as anti-capital: As the veneer of democracy starts to fade ; Lions after slumber, or what is sublimation today? ; The outside of everything now ; For your unpleasure: the hauter-couture of Goth ; It doesn't matter if we all die: the Cure's unholy trinity ; Look at the light ; Is pop undead? ; Memorex for the kraken: the Fall's pulp modernism ; Scritti's sweet sickness ; Postmodernism as pathology, part 2 ; Choose your weapons ; Variations on a theme ; Running on empty ; You remind me of gold: dialogue with Mark Fisher and Simon Reynolds ; Militant tendencies feed music ; Autonomy in the UK ; The secret sadness of the twenty-first century: James Blake's Overgrown ; Review: David Bowie's The next day ; The man who has everything: Drake's Nothing was the same ; Break it down: DJ Rashad's Double cup ; Start your nonsense! on eMMplekz and Dolly Dolly ; Review: Sleaford Mods' Divide and exit and Chubbed up: the singles collection ; Test Dept: where leftist idealism and popular modernism collide ; No romance without finance)
Part four: For now, our desire is nameless: political writings (Don't vote, don't encourage them ; October 6, 1979: capitalism and bipolar disorder ; What if they had a protest and everyone came ; Defeating the Hydra ; The face of terrorism without a face ; Conspicuous force and verminisation ; My card, my life: comments on the AMEX Red campaign ; The great Bullingdon Club swindle ; The privatisation of stress ; Kettle logic ; Winter of discontent 2.0: notes on a month of militancy ; Football / capitalist realism / Utopia ; The game has changed ; Creative capitalism ; Reality management ; UK tabloid ; The future is still ours: autonomy and post-capitalism ; Aesthetic poverty ; The only certainties are death and capital ; Why mental health is a political issue ; The London hunger games ; Time-wars: towards an alternative for the neo-capitalist era ; Not failing better, but fighting to win ; The happiness of Margaret Thatcher ; Suffering with a smile ; How to kill a zombie: strategising the end of neoliberalism ; Getting away with murder ; No one is bored, everything is boring ; A time for shadows ; Limbo is over ; Communist realism ; Pain now ; Abandon hope (summer is coming) ; For now, our desire is nameless ; Anti-therapy ; Democracy is joy ; Cybergothic vs. steampunk ; Mannequin challenge)
Part five: We have to invent the future: interviews (They can be different in the future too: interviewed by Rowan Wilson for Ready steady book (2010) ; Capitalism realism: interviewed by Richard Capes (2011) ; Preoccupying: interviewed by the Occupied Times (2012) ; We need a post-capitalist vision: interviewed by AntiCapitalist Initiative (2012) ; "We have to invent the future": an unseen interview with Mark Fisher (2012) ; Hauntology, nostalgia and lost futures: interviewed by Valerio Mannucci and Valerio Mattioli for Nero (2014))
Part six: We are not here to entertain you: reflections (One year later... ; Spinoza, k-punk, neuropunk ; Why Dissensus? ; New comments policy ; Comments policy (latest) ; Chronic demotivation ; How to keep Oedipus alive in cyberspace ; We dogmatists ; London litened ; No future 2012 ; Ridicule is nothing to be scared of (Slight return) ; Breakthrough in Grey lair ; Real abstractions: the application of theory to the modern world ; No I've never had a job... ; Fear and misery in neoliberal Britain ; Exiting the vampire castle ; Good for nothing)
Part seven: Acid communism (Acid communism (unfinished introduction)).
Summary: This comprehensive collection brings together the work of acclaimed blogger, writer, political activist and lecturer Mark Fisher (aka k-punk). Covering the period 2004 - 2016, the collection will include some of the best writings from his seminal blog k-punk; a selection of his brilliantly insightful film, television and music reviews; his key writings on politics, activism, precarity, hauntology, mental health and popular modernism for numerous websites and magazines; his final unfinished introduction to his planned work on "Acid Communism"; and a number of important interviews from the last decade. Edited by Darren Ambrose and with a foreword by Simon Reynolds.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 192 FIS Available 39270004877407

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

A comprehensive collection of the writings of Mark Fisher (1968-2017), whose work defined critical writing for a generation. <br> <br> This comprehensive collection brings together the work of acclaimed blogger, writer, political activist and lecturer Mark Fisher (aka k-punk). Covering the period 2004 - 2016, the collection will include some of the best writings from his seminal blog k-punk; a selection of his brilliantly insightful film, television and music reviews; his key writings on politics, activism, precarity, hauntology, mental health and popular modernism for numerous websites and magazines; his final unfinished introduction to his planned work on "Acid Communism"; and a number of important interviews from the last decade. Edited by Darren Ambrose and with a foreword by Simon Reynolds.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 773-814).

Foreword / Simon Reynolds -- Editor's introduction / Darren Ambrose -- Why K?

Part one: Methods of dreaming: books (Book meme ; Space, time, light, all the essentials: reflections on J.G. Ballard season (BBC 4) ; Why I want to fuck Ronald Reagan ; A fairground's painted swings ; What are the politics of boredom?: (Ballard 2003 Remix) ; Let me be your fantasy ; Fantasy kits: Steven Meisel's "State of emergency" ; The assassination of J. G. Ballard ; A world of dread and fear ; Ripley's glam ; Methods of dreaming ; Atwood's anti-capitalism ; Toy stories: puppets, dolls and horror stories ; Zer0 Books statement)

Part two: Screens, dreams and spectres: film and television (A spoonful of sugar ; She's not my mother ; Stand up, Nigel Barton ; Portmeirion: an ideal for living ; Golgothic materialism ; This movie doesn't move me ; Fear and misery in the Third Reich 'n' Roll ; We want it all ; Gothic Oedipus: subjectivity and capitalism in Christiopher Nolan's Batman begins ; When we dream, do we dream we're Joey? ; Notes on Cronenberg's eXistenZ ; I filmed it so I didn't have to remember it myself ; Spectres of marker and the reality of the Third Way ; Dis-identity politics ; "You have always been the caretaker": the spectral spaces of the Overlook Hotel ; Coffee bars and internment camps ; Rebel without a cause ; Robot historian in the ruins ; Review of Tyson ; "They killed their mother": Avatar as ideological symbol ; Precarity and paternalism ; Return of the gift: Richard Kelly's The box ; Contributing to society ; "Just relax and enjoy it": Geworfenheit on the BBC ; Star Wars was a sell-out from the start ; Gillian Wearing: Self made ; Batman's political right turn ; Remember who the enemy is ; Beyond good and evil: Breaking bad ; Classless broadcasting: Benefits Street ; Rooting for the enemy: The Americans ; How to let go: The leftovers, Broadchurch and The missing ; The strange death of British satire ; Review: Terminator Genisys ; The house that fame built: Celebrity Big Brother ; Sympathy for the androids: the twisted morality of Westworld)

Part three: Choose your weapons: writing on music (The by now traditional Glasto rant ; Art pop, no, really ; k-punk, or the glampunk art pop discontinuum ; Noise as anti-capital: As the veneer of democracy starts to fade ; Lions after slumber, or what is sublimation today? ; The outside of everything now ; For your unpleasure: the hauter-couture of Goth ; It doesn't matter if we all die: the Cure's unholy trinity ; Look at the light ; Is pop undead? ; Memorex for the kraken: the Fall's pulp modernism ; Scritti's sweet sickness ; Postmodernism as pathology, part 2 ; Choose your weapons ; Variations on a theme ; Running on empty ; You remind me of gold: dialogue with Mark Fisher and Simon Reynolds ; Militant tendencies feed music ; Autonomy in the UK ; The secret sadness of the twenty-first century: James Blake's Overgrown ; Review: David Bowie's The next day ; The man who has everything: Drake's Nothing was the same ; Break it down: DJ Rashad's Double cup ; Start your nonsense! on eMMplekz and Dolly Dolly ; Review: Sleaford Mods' Divide and exit and Chubbed up: the singles collection ; Test Dept: where leftist idealism and popular modernism collide ; No romance without finance)

Part four: For now, our desire is nameless: political writings (Don't vote, don't encourage them ; October 6, 1979: capitalism and bipolar disorder ; What if they had a protest and everyone came ; Defeating the Hydra ; The face of terrorism without a face ; Conspicuous force and verminisation ; My card, my life: comments on the AMEX Red campaign ; The great Bullingdon Club swindle ; The privatisation of stress ; Kettle logic ; Winter of discontent 2.0: notes on a month of militancy ; Football / capitalist realism / Utopia ; The game has changed ; Creative capitalism ; Reality management ; UK tabloid ; The future is still ours: autonomy and post-capitalism ; Aesthetic poverty ; The only certainties are death and capital ; Why mental health is a political issue ; The London hunger games ; Time-wars: towards an alternative for the neo-capitalist era ; Not failing better, but fighting to win ; The happiness of Margaret Thatcher ; Suffering with a smile ; How to kill a zombie: strategising the end of neoliberalism ; Getting away with murder ; No one is bored, everything is boring ; A time for shadows ; Limbo is over ; Communist realism ; Pain now ; Abandon hope (summer is coming) ; For now, our desire is nameless ; Anti-therapy ; Democracy is joy ; Cybergothic vs. steampunk ; Mannequin challenge)

Part five: We have to invent the future: interviews (They can be different in the future too: interviewed by Rowan Wilson for Ready steady book (2010) ; Capitalism realism: interviewed by Richard Capes (2011) ; Preoccupying: interviewed by the Occupied Times (2012) ; We need a post-capitalist vision: interviewed by AntiCapitalist Initiative (2012) ; "We have to invent the future": an unseen interview with Mark Fisher (2012) ; Hauntology, nostalgia and lost futures: interviewed by Valerio Mannucci and Valerio Mattioli for Nero (2014))

Part six: We are not here to entertain you: reflections (One year later... ; Spinoza, k-punk, neuropunk ; Why Dissensus? ; New comments policy ; Comments policy (latest) ; Chronic demotivation ; How to keep Oedipus alive in cyberspace ; We dogmatists ; London litened ; No future 2012 ; Ridicule is nothing to be scared of (Slight return) ; Breakthrough in Grey lair ; Real abstractions: the application of theory to the modern world ; No I've never had a job... ; Fear and misery in neoliberal Britain ; Exiting the vampire castle ; Good for nothing)

Part seven: Acid communism (Acid communism (unfinished introduction)).

This comprehensive collection brings together the work of acclaimed blogger, writer, political activist and lecturer Mark Fisher (aka k-punk). Covering the period 2004 - 2016, the collection will include some of the best writings from his seminal blog k-punk; a selection of his brilliantly insightful film, television and music reviews; his key writings on politics, activism, precarity, hauntology, mental health and popular modernism for numerous websites and magazines; his final unfinished introduction to his planned work on "Acid Communism"; and a number of important interviews from the last decade. Edited by Darren Ambrose and with a foreword by Simon Reynolds.

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