Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Ordinary girls : a memoir /

by Díaz, Jaquira [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chapel Hill, North Carolina : Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2019.Edition: First edition.Description: 321 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781616209131 (hardcover).Subject(s): Díaz, Jaquira -- Childhood and youth | Díaz, Jaquira -- Family | Lesbian authors -- Puerto Rico -- Biography | Racially mixed women -- Puerto Rico -- Biography | Families -- Puerto Rico | Mentally ill women | Substance abuse
Contents:
Girl hood -- Origin story -- El Caserío -- La otra -- Home is a place -- Monster story -- Candy girl -- Ordinary girls -- Fourteen, or how to be a juvenile delinquent -- Girls, monsters -- Beach city -- Battle stations -- Secrets -- Mother, mercy -- Returning -- Ordinary girls.
Summary: "Jaquira Díaz writes an unflinching account of growing up as a queer biracial girl searching for home as her family splits apart and her mother struggles with mental illness and addiction. From her own struggles with depression and drug abuse to her experiences of violence to Puerto Rico's history of colonialism, every page vibrates with music and lyricism"-- Provided by publisher.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult New Arrivals BIO DIA, J. Available 39270004866103

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

One of the Must-Read Books of 2019 According to O: The Oprah Magazine * Time * Bustle * Electric Literature * Publishers Weekly * The Millions * The Week * Good Housekeeping <br> <br> "There is more life packed on each page of Ordinary Girls than some lives hold in a lifetime." --Julia Alvarez <br> <br> In this searing memoir, Jaquira Díaz writes fiercely and eloquently of her challenging girlhood and triumphant coming of age.<br> <br> While growing up in housing projects in Puerto Rico and Miami Beach, Díaz found herself caught between extremes. As her family split apart and her mother battled schizophrenia, she was supported by the love of her friends. As she longed for a family and home, her life was upended by violence. As she celebrated her Puerto Rican culture, she couldn't find support for her burgeoning sexual identity. From her own struggles with depression and sexual assault to Puerto Rico's history of colonialism, every page of Ordinary Girls vibrates with music and lyricism. Díaz writes with raw and refreshing honesty, triumphantly mapping a way out of despair toward love and hope to become her version of the girl she always wanted to be.<br> <br> Reminiscent of Tara Westover's Educated , Kiese Laymon's Heavy , Mary Karr's The Liars' Club , and Terese Marie Mailhot's Heart Berries , Jaquira Díaz's memoir provides a vivid portrait of a life lived in (and beyond) the borders of Puerto Rico and its complicated history--and reads as electrically as a novel.

"Jaquira Díaz writes an unflinching account of growing up as a queer biracial girl searching for home as her family splits apart and her mother struggles with mental illness and addiction. From her own struggles with depression and drug abuse to her experiences of violence to Puerto Rico's history of colonialism, every page vibrates with music and lyricism"-- Provided by publisher.

Girl hood -- Origin story -- El Caserío -- La otra -- Home is a place -- Monster story -- Candy girl -- Ordinary girls -- Fourteen, or how to be a juvenile delinquent -- Girls, monsters -- Beach city -- Battle stations -- Secrets -- Mother, mercy -- Returning -- Ordinary girls.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

What does it mean to be an ordinary girl? For Diaz, everything, including remembering, "we were happy once." Her compelling debut is one of unpredictability, recalling her family's move from place to place in Puerto Rico, her parents always in search of a better life. Meanwhile, her abuela provided the support that her parents could not, as Mami lived with mental illness and Papi sought refuge in work. Diaz writes affectionately about the emotional toll of schizophrenia, and how Mami became adrift. In Diaz's telling, she lost her slowly while becoming angry at the whole world--and as a result felt unmoored within it. Set against Puerto Rico's history of colonialism, the narrative follows Diaz and her family as they relocate to Miami Beach, FL, finding the promise of a richer life unfulfilled. Diaz recounts her experiences with depression, seeking comfort from friends and partners after her parents' divorce. Powerful later chapters relate her marriage at a young age, decision to enlist in the military, and the aftermath of those choices. Her ongoing self-discovery leads her to turn to writing as a means of embracing herself and her sexuality. VERDICT A must-read memoir on vulnerability, courage, and everything in between from a standout writer. [See Prepub Alert, 4/1/19]--Stephanie Sendaula, Library Journal

Novelist Select