Not if I can help it /

by Mackler, Carolyn [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York, NY : Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., 2019.Edition: First edition.Description: 230 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780545709484; 0545709482.Subject(s): Sensory disorders -- Juvenile fiction | Adjustment (Psychology) -- Juvenile fiction | Life skills -- Juvenile fiction | Fathers and daughters -- Juvenile fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction | Families -- New York (State) -- New York -- Juvenile fiction | Best friends -- Juvenile fiction | Manhattan (New York, N.Y.) -- Juvenile fiction | Sensory disorders -- Fiction | Life skills -- Fiction | Fathers and daughters -- Fiction | Brothers and sisters -- Fiction | Family life -- New York (State) -- New York -- Fiction | Best friends -- Fiction | Friendship -- Fiction | New York (N.Y.) -- Fiction | Children's storiesSummary: Willa lives on the upper West Side of Manhattan with her divorced father and her younger brother and attends fifth grade with her best friend Ruby, and she likes things to be a certain way, because it makes life manageable even with her Sensory Processing Disorder; she certainly does not like surprises, and her father has just thrown her a big one: he has been dating Ruby's mother, and suddenly Willa's life seems to be spiraling out of her control--and part of the trouble is that she cannot even explain why she thinks this is a horrible idea, when everyone else thinks that it is wonderful.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Children's Collection Children's Fiction J MAC Available 39270004861625

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

From award-winning Carolyn Mackler, the story of Willa, who has been living with Sensory Processing Disorder but is thrown for a BIG loop when her dad announces he's dating Willa's best friend's mom. <br> <br> Willa likes certain things to be certain ways. Her socks have to be soft . . . and definitely can't have irritating tags on the inside. She loves the crunch of popcorn and nachos . . . but is grossed out by the crunch of a baby carrot. And slimy foods? Those are the worst.<br> <br> Willa can manage all these things -- but there are some things she can't deal with, like her father's big news. He's been keeping a big secret from her . . . that he's been dating the mom of Willa's best friend Ruby. Willa does NOT like the idea of them being together. And she does NOT like the idea of combining families. And she does NOT like the idea of her best friend becoming her sister overnight. Will she go along with all of these changes? NOT if she can help it!

Willa lives on the upper West Side of Manhattan with her divorced father and her younger brother and attends fifth grade with her best friend Ruby, and she likes things to be a certain way, because it makes life manageable even with her Sensory Processing Disorder; she certainly does not like surprises, and her father has just thrown her a big one: he has been dating Ruby's mother, and suddenly Willa's life seems to be spiraling out of her control--and part of the trouble is that she cannot even explain why she thinks this is a horrible idea, when everyone else thinks that it is wonderful.

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Horn Book Review

On the cusp of middle school, eleven-year-old Willa Anderson Grover suddenly learns that her divorced father has been dating her best friend Ruby Chaudharys mother. Hurt and worried, Willa (whose sensory processing issues contribute to her dislike of change) is jealous when her dad and Ruby begin to bond. Preferring to keep her sensory challenges private, Willa agonizes over Ruby and her mothers plan to move into the Manhattan apartment Willa shares with her father and younger brother. Willas accessible first-person narration provides relatable information about her interests (her love of dogs and LEGOs), and the feelings of alienation and turmoil she experiences surrounding the parental romance and rift in her friendship with Ruby; readers witness the sensory issues becoming exacerbated by the mounting changes. Comfortingly, the adults in the girls lives work together to help them feel supported as they adjust to their places in a newly blended family. Per the appended authors note, Macklers son was the storys inspiration; Willas everyday interactions help demystify sensory processing challenges, and her humor, honest reactions, and strong sense of identity offer readers going through their own big changes some solace and understanding. julie roach September/October 2019 p.94(c) Copyright 2019. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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